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(2) 





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(3) 



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" melodious pastimes." 

A New Book for Violin and Piano. 

Choice, Easy Solos, with Piano Accompaniment. 

Comprises pieces free from difficulty in the matter of key, bowing, 
unusual fingering, etc. The compositions are by J. S. BEAZLEY. 
The compilation will delight all young players of the violin. En- 
tirely new, novel, and entertaining. Price, $1.00, postpaid. 

"ROBERT FRANZ'S albUm of SONG." 

Two volumes, German and English text. The songs are works 
of art, and no assortment of good vocal music is complete without 
them. Price each volume, postpaid, heavy paper, 50 cents. 

"roYaL collection of 

FOUr-HaNd iviUsic." 

Selected Piano=forte Duets. 
Easy. Bright. Sure to Please. 

Contains all the latest and best piano music for two performers. 
36 pieces; easy, bright, with abundance of variety. Sheet-music 
size, 160 pages, 50 cents, postpaid. 

"SIX LoVe soNgs." 

By Frank E. Sawyer. A new album of pleasing lyrics. 
Excellent vocal music, well-written piano accompaniment, and 
tender, passionate love lines from Heine's poems, make this 
collection immensely charming. Sheet-music size. 75 cents, 
postpaid. 

"BOOTT'S ALBUlVl OF SONG." 

A New Collection of Charming Lyrics. 

Each song is a gem, both in text and musical setting. Refined, 
artistic treatment is exhibited in the piano accompaniments. There 
is a large variety of choice selections. Price, $1.00, postpaid. 

NOTE. — We arc the largest and oldest music publishing house 

in America ; pit/dish 2q different catalogues, describing over 100,000 
pieces of Sheet Music, 3,000 Music Books, and 8,000 Octavo 
Choruses. A half-century accumulation of lists and plates, large 
importing facilities, prestige abroad, and influence at home, make 
our house a source of supply for the great American Musical Public. 

SECURE CATALOGUES 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY, 

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(5) 



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STUDIES FOR ALL BRANCHES OF ART WORK. 

Mathematical Instruments, Drawing Paper, and T Squares. 

o o o 

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IN GENERAL. 



Picture Framing in all Styles. 



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Catalogues free on application. Mail orders receive prompt attention. 

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(6) 



L. P. Hollander & Co. 

BOSTON: Boylston St. and Park Sq. NEWPORT: Casino Building. 



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IDEAS ON FASHIONS. 

(7) 



•TIB GNMren must 







Study * Plant." 



npHE "COMMITTEE OF TKIV," in their recent report on 
Science Study, said of Botany: 
" The study, to be of much value, must consist largely of laboratory work, 
actual work bv the pupils, with plants and animals. This cannot be too 
strongly emphasized." . . . "Laboratory work should be the chief feat- 
ure of the year's course in Botany." . . . " A good Compound Microscope 
and a few ordinary reagents in small quantities ( including, at least, alcohol, 
potassic hydrate, glycerine, iodine, and other staining fluids) should be 
furnished each punil." 

How to get this Apparatus, etc. — It is the special business of 
the FRANKLIN EDUCATIONAL COMPANY to prepare and furnish 
all kinds of instruments, books of reference, or guides, — in short, all 
Laboratory Supplies needed in the study of science. 

A Superior Imported Compound Microscope. 

Student's Stand (Leitz No. V.), Objective 3, Eyepieces I. and V. 

Magnifying- from 57 to 140 diameters $17.00 

Student's Stand "(Leitz No. V.), Objective 6, Eyepiece III. Mag- 
nifying 310 diameters 21.00 

Student's Stand (Leitz No. V.), Objectives No. 3 and 7, Eyepieces 

I. and V. Magnifying from 57 to Soo diameters . . . 27.00 

Outfit of Reagents, etc., 

As recommended for Botanical Study, consisting of the following: 1 oz. 
alcohol, i oz. potassic hydrate, 1 oz. glycerine, 1 oz. iodine solution, 10 g. 
picric acid, 10 g. aniline blue, 1 pair forceps No. 2, 2 needles. Put up in 
neat, substantial box. Price, $1.25. 

Magnifiers of all kinds. 

TRIPOD MAGNIFIERS, 22 mm. lens, recommended for class 
dissection, the Cheapest Self-supporting Lens, allowing use 

of both hands, each $0.50 

TRIPOD MAGNIFIERS, 30 mm. lens, each 0.75 

Magnifiers, Rubber Cased, one, two, or three lenses, each, from $0.25 to 0.95 

Magnifiers, Linen Provers, each $0.35, $0.40, and 0.50 

Magnifiers, French Coddington, each .... from $1.50 to 2.50 
Magnifiers, German Coddington, each 2.00 

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each $0.25 

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come off, each 0.07 

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SCISSORS, No. 3 fine, lock joint, each o.^o 

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(8) 



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(9) 



VOLUME IV 



AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

1894 




EDWARD LASELL, 

Professor of Chemistry, Williams College, 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




CHARLES C. BRAGDON, 

PresEnt Principal. 









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1894. 



TO THE 



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WE THE 



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LOVINGLY DEDICATE 



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MABEL T AYLOR. 

H ELEN MORRIS. 

mari E Mcdonald. 

J ULIA MURPHY. 

MABEL L U TES. 

DOROTHY MAN N ING. 

MAY D I CKSON. 

GRACE L O UD. 

ANNIE R ICHARDS. 

S ARA BOND. 



MABEL S 


A 


WYER. 


GRACE A 


L 


LEN. 


ELEANOR C 


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APP. 


ALICE ANDR 


E 


ESEN. 


BELLE B 


R 


AGDON. 


BERTHA 


L 


ILLIBRIDGE. 


SARAH HAYD 


E 


N. 



CAROL I NE STEEL. 

(16) 



Ninet^-ftve 




Sara Bond, Annie Richards, Grace E. Loud, May Dickson, 

Sara Hayden, K. Belle Bragdon, Eleanor R. Clapp, Mabel Sawyer, Helen B. Morris, 

Alice Andreesen, Dorothy M. Manning, Grace L. Allen, Mabel C. Taylor, Marie McDonald, Caroline L. Steel, 

Mabel M. Lutes, Bertha A. Lili.ibridge, Julia Murphy. 













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Preface. 



" \ T 7 ITHIN this awful volume lies The mystery of mysteries." 

y y The Allerlei of the Class of '95 is before you, and we bespeak for it your 

kindest thoughts and gentlest criticisms. 

Those to whom it may seem that our book deals with trifling subjects should remember 
that the simplest events of school life are interesting to those who have participated in them. 

This book is neither more nor less than it pretends to be ; it is a collection of memories, 
which in after years will be dear to all of us. Our task has been a pleasant one, and we hope 
our work will prove as enjoyable to our readers as it has to us. There is a certain fascination 
in sending our first, and probably only book into the world, to be received, we know not how 
Will you pass it by without a glance of approbation, or will you laugh with us over the jokes 
and grinds, in the disposal of which we have endeavored to show no partiality? Remember that 
our aim has been to amuse ; that we have felt ill-will toward none, but rather have cherished in 
our hearts love and kindness towards all. 

We feel a certain pride and satisfaction, which is natural to all who have accomplished a 

task over which they have worked earnestly and with enthusiasm. Since our earliest days at 

(21) 



Lasell, we have looked forward to our Junior year as a time when great things are expected of 
us. Whether we have fulfilled this expectation is for you to judge. 

We thank most heartily those who have aided us in our labors, and helped to bring before 
the public this book. Enough has been said to show you our intentions and our aim ; nothing 
more is needed but for us to retire and leave the book to speak for itself. 




(22) 



P»oard of Trasfees. 



Rev. Wm. R. Clark. D.D., 

Rev. C. Rarkhurst, D.D., 

Rroe. Jules Luquiens, 
C. C. Bragdon, 

Mrs. C. C. Bragdon. 



Pacaltv 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M.A., 

Principal. 
Constitution of United States and Political Economy, 

CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

Assistant Principal. 
English Literature and History. 

DELIA M. STRONG, 

Preceptress. 
Manners and Dress. 

GEORGE M. STEELE, D.D., 
Pastor. 

Bible, Ethics, Psychology. 

WILLIAM J. ROLFE, M.A., 
Shakespeare. 

ANNA R. LATIMER, 
English . 

LILLIE M. PACKARD, Ph.B., 

Mathematics. 



HERBERT LOWELL RICH, Ph.B., 

Natural Sciences. 

ADELE ROTH, 
German. 

JEANNE LE ROYER, 
French. 

ADALINE W. ALLEN, 
Latin and Greek. 



ISABEL SHINN, 
Reading. 



MARTHA A. RANSOM, 



Physical Culture and Swimming. 



ELIZABETH C. McMARTIN, 

Assistant in Gymnastics. 



ANNIE P. CALL, 

Nerve Training. 



f2 4 ) 



MAJOR GEORGE H. BENYON, 
Military Drill. 



JOSEPH A. HILLS, 
Pianoforte. 



J. WALTER DAYIS, 
Voice Culture and Chorus Singing. 



WILLIS E. NOWELL, 
Violin. 

KATE E. PLUMMER, 
Organ. 

LOUISE PUTNAM, 

Guitar and Mandolin. 



HENRY ORNE RYDER, 

Drawing and Painting. 



ADELINE L. ADAMS, 

History of Art. 



ANNA BARROWS, 



Cooking. Demonstrations. 



ANNA M. NICHOLLS, 

Cooking. Practice Classes. 



ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 
Book-keeping. 



WILLIAM D. BRIDGE, 

Phonography. 



EMILY H. GENN, 
Typewriting. 



SUSAN TRUE, 



Dress-cutting. 



MARY L. NUTT, 

Nurse. 



LOUIS B. WILLIAMS, 

Penmanship. 



FRANK PARTRIDGE, 

Cornet. 



(25) 



CLASSES 



1 in the very Dvtay-morn of their youth." 



Fresfyman Class. 



Motto: "They can because they think they can." 



Class Colors : Red and White. 



Class Flower: Red Carnation. 



Winifred T. Conlin 
Alice Beesley 



President. 
Secretary. 



Names. 

Alice Beesley, S.D.* . 
Edith Blair, Lasellia f 
Josephine Burkert 
Winifred T. Conlin, Lasellia 
Isabelle Hyde 
Ida M. Kessinger, Lasellia 
Bessie L. Smith, S.D. 
Anna P. Warner, S.D. 
Anna P. Whitman, Lasellia 



Residences. 

Denver, Col. 
Wyoming, Ohio 
Portland, Me. . 
New York City 
Newtonville, Mass. 
Rome, N.Y. . 
Lebanon, Ohio 
Washington, D.C. 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Rooms. 

16 
Annex 

63 
10 

45 

*9 

Annex 

18 



* S.D. Society. 



t Lasellia Club. 



(29) 



Freeman Class History. 



IT has long been the custom of the historian to boast the achievements of her class, but we 
are unassuming, and prefer rather that our virtues be heralded by others than ourselves. 

Although few in numbers, considering our youth, we may say that we have a fair amount 
of ability which we hope may develop as we grow in years. 

As for our demeanor, it is so eminently proper that one of our number was lately taken 
for a Junior. 

Of course we study a great deal, but we feel that our social relations should not be neg- 
lected, therefore we consider ourselves under obligation to spend a large portion of our time in 
visiting the rooms of our numerous friends. Strange to say, the Preceptress does not appreciate 
our social propensities, and we have been surprised and grieved, when helping some of our dear 
friends to while away the monotony of study hour, at being sent to our rooms rather unceremoni- 
ously. At first our sensitive spirits were wounded by such unkind treatment, but we are now 
becoming somewhat accustomed to the ways of this cold and heartless world. 

Although I have said we are not boastful, yet I cannot refrain from mentioning our extreme 
brilliancy in the French Class — this is the one study in which we most excel ; we have the true 
Parisian accent, as Mademoiselle herself can testify, and our smooth translations and aptness for 
remembering the intricacies of grammar might for some classes be termed phenomenal success. 

We like to make those around us happy, and on one occasion one of our number kindly 
exerted herself to entertain the Geometry Class by her sprightly conduct ; but our disinterested 

(30) 



actions are too often misunderstood, and our unfortunate mate was ignominiously sent from the 
room. 

One of our number was obliged to go home on account of ill-health, and although, since 
her departure, several new members have joined us, who are very welcome additions to our class, 
yet some places can never quite be filled. We have our representatives in the studio, and various 
musical departments, and one of our class has won laurels as an elocutionist. Of course we have 
our faults; who has not? but we are endowed with a spirit of perseverance which can but over- 
come all obstacles, and when the long years have rolled by, and we shall have attained, at last, 
to Senior dignity, we trust that the foundations laid in our Freshman year will prove an honor to 
the Class of '97. 

(30 



" 00 e §now our price, voe are wort ft no ^orse a place. 



11 




tliffKN 



3opf)oiDore Class. 



Motto: "Deeds, not words." 



Class Colors : Heliotrope and white. 



Class Flower : Heliotrope. 



Blanche L. Kelley 
Louise P. Hubbard 



President. 
Secretary. 



Names. 

Martha E. Avery 
Isabel E. Bronson, S.D. 
Katharine Bucknum, S.D. 
Josephine B. Chandler, Lasellia 
Clara L. Creswell, Lasellia 
Mamie Cruickshank, S.D. 
Annie Cushing, Lasellia 
Jane E. Fitch 
Harriette P. Fitch 
Bessie Hayward . 
Lestra M. Hibberd, S.D. 
Louise P. Hubbard, S.D. 
Marion Josselyn, Lasellia 
Blanche L. Kelley, S.D. 
Ethel Loud, Lasellia . 
Kate Pennell, S.D. 
Florence A. Ray, S.D. 
Cara A. Sawin, Lasellia 
Beulah H. Shannon, S.D. 
Grace B. Snyder, S.D. 
Julia Tulleys, Lasellia . 
Ella W. Wilson, Lasellia 



Residences. 

Plymouth, Mass. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Denver, Col. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Denver, Col. 
Boston, Mass. 
Foxcroft, Me. 
Morers, N.Y. 
Morers, N.Y. 
Temple, N.H. 
Richmond, Ind. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Manchester, N.H. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Everett, Mass. 
Atchison, Kan. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Troy, N.Y. . 
Medford, Mass. 
Washington, D.C. 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 
New York City . 

(35) 



Rooms. 

35 
29 

58 
8 

23 
14 
65 
37 
37 
70 

39 

27 
28 

57 
30 

7 
29 

ii 

8 

38 

62 

Annex 



^opI)oiDore Class History. 



IN eighteen hundred and ninety-one a wonderful event came to pass, — the Class of Ninety-six 
first entered the classic halls of Lasell and began the work which will make their names 
immortal. As preparatories — well, you ought to talk with our respective and respected teachers. 
They would tell you what our timidity forbids us to tell. They would tell you that we had none 
of the verdant look that Freshmen usually wear, and that as Sophomores, our record is as clean as 
when we first entered. There has been a steady increase in numbers from year to year. The 
first year, we were fifteen ; the second, seventeen ; and now we are proud to say we have twenty- 
one in the class. Of these, six are the original class, and we are certain that the majority of us 
will, in June of eighteen hundred and ninety-six, receive from the hand of Professor Bragdon that 
much-coveted piece of parchment tied with the Lasell color, which will be cherished by us to 
the last day of our lives. 

The first year we did not materialize as a class, the Faculty having the mistaken idea that 
we were too young ; but last year we had a fine organization, with a president upon whom de- 
volved the duties of secretary and treasurer. We organized in the beginning of this year, electing 
a new girl to undertake the duties of the president. 

Last year the Freshmen and Sophomores enjoyed very much a reception given by the 
Faculty, but we have been so busy this year that we have had no time for such frivolities. 

We are not a boastful class, but should you chance to mention us to our honored Professor 
in Physics, I am sure he would say that he never before received such inspiration from his 

(36) 



students. And the "Trig" — ! Some day the world will hear of a famous woman, a graduate of 
Lasell in ninety-six, who has undertaken to survey the North Pole and the Atlantic Ocean. In 
this class we follow our motto, " Deeds, not words," most faithfully. Not a sound is heard dur- 
ing the whole recitation period but Miss Packard's voice and the heavy breathing of the girls who 
are busy looking up the " log cosine " and the " colog tan." And our hard work is sure to tell 
in our reviews, which all consider fair and right. In addition to our other studies, most of us 
take either instrumental or vocal music, elocution, or guitar, and one enterprising girl takes lessons 
upon three instruments. Our class flower, the heliotrope, is thought by partial friends to be sym- 
bolical of our natures, — sweet, pure, and modest. I am certain that all who know us will join 
in three hearty cheers for the Class of Ninety-six. 

(37) 



"@ne of the few, the immortal names, that were not bom to die!' 



V) !& 




Janior Oa&s. 



Motto 
Class Colors : Purple and Gold. 



"Pa/ma non sine Lahore est." 

Class Flowers : Violet and Marshal Niel Rose. 
Honorary Member. 




Mabel C. 


Taylor 


. 


President. 










Marie McDonald ..... Secretary. 


Helen B. Morris ..... Treasurer. 


Names. Residences. Rooms. 


Grace L. Allen, S.D. . . . Omaha, Neb. . . 24 


Alice Andressen, S.D. 






Omaha, Neb. 












60 


Sara A. Bond, S.D. 






Boston, Mass. 












6 


K. Belle Bragdon, S.D. 






Auburndale, Mass. 














Eleanor R. Clapp, S.D. 






East Weymouth, Mass. 












. Annex 


Anne May Dickson 






Martinsville, Ind. . 












33 


Sara Hayden, Lasellia 






Hartford, Conn. . 












65 


Bertha A. Lillibridge, S.D. . 






Minneapolis, Minn. 












22 


Grace E. Loud, Lasellia 






Everett, Mass. 












30 


Mabel M. Lutes, S.D. 






Indianapolis, Ind. 












26 


Dorothy M. Manning, S.D. 






Dayton, O. 












53 


Marie McDonald, S.D. 






St. Joseph, Mo. . . 












40 


Helen B. Morris, Lasellia . 






Boston, Mass. 












1 


Julia Murphy 






Portsmouth, 0. 












i5 


Annie E. Richards, S.D. 






Weymouth, Mass. 












27 


Mabel W. Sawyer, Lasellia . 






Dexter, Me. 












5 


Caroline L. Steel, S.D. 






Portland, Ore. 












59 


Mabel C. Taylor, S.D. 






Omaha, Neb. 
(41) 












24 











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AJCZ-^Z- 



Jantor Class History. 



T 



HINGS which are the greatest and most wonderful are often those about which the least 
should be said." 



We all know that unless our thoughts are very shallow and trivial, even the marvellous 
faculty of language is inadequate to express all we think about certain subjects. As the Junior 
Class has always kept closely to the above motto in regard to themselves, this history will be 
short. Of course many sheets of foolscap could be covered in enumerating the wonders of '95, 
but why write down facts which are so self-evident ? And even if we would, we have no sooner 
begun on such an extensive theme, than we realize the incompleteness of the English language in 
regard to adjectives. What pen could rightly describe the genius of second Raphaels and Titians, 
before whose works the Old Masters would turn green with envy? What folly to attempt a 
characterization of those who give promise of some day becoming Beethovens, Mozarts, and 
Melbas ! Nevertheless, inadequate as we feel ourselves to express what we would, we take 
comfort in the fact, that most of us having been here so long, you know us well enough to 
make words superfluous. 

But do not imagine for a moment that we think too highly of ourselves, for we did not 
seek fame, it has rather been thrust upon us. What was our surprise to awake one morning, like 
Byron, and find ourselves famous, — the observed of all observers ! How this came about we know 
not, but as the days went by we came to understand that the respect paid to each one of us, 
was on account of the awe with which that great and mighty organization, the Junior Class, was 
regarded. Even the grave Seniors would pause as they passed, and point us out, with looks full 
of reverence, as among the wonders of Lasell. Indeed, to the Seniors the Junior Class should 
extend a vote of thanks for the kind interest they have taken in us this past year, and the 
grateful recognition they have brought us from young and old. 

The question was once asked: "What is the most characteristic Junior study?" As far as 
such a query can be answered, what better place could be found to do so than here in our class 
history ? There is no doubt as to our favorite study ; in this we would all agree unanimously : 

(43) 



Literature ! Even as our advanced sisters consider their forte the realm of Ethics and Moral 
Science, so do we excel in that most fascinating study of writings. Only a visit to recitation- 
room Number 4 at nine o'clock on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday could give any one a 
clear idea of how fully this comprehensive subject is grasped. The number of quotations from 
various authors would prove to the listeners that those who gave them were familiar with all 
writings to a degree which would astonish the most learned reader, and the knowledge of the 
trivial details of the poets' lives indicate a close acquaintance with these great men. Was it not 
a Junior who never was seen without her " Paradise Lost," taking it wherever she went, living 
wholly engrossed in its wonderful beauties, and becoming so strengthened by its constant perusal 
that food and drink were but secondary matters. 

Last year, as '94 paused on the threshold before entering the Senior portals, they thought 
of their successors, and threw back to us the following words to aid us on the path their weary 
feet had just trodden : " Noble Endeavor, Self-sacrifice, Aspiration, Concentration, E Pluribus 
unum, and Excelsior." 

They were kind to think of us in that important period of their lives ; and what have we 
done with their gifts? Our endeavors — we hope they are noble — have resulted in this book 
you are now reading ; all through the year our efforts have concentrated themselves in sending 
from Lasell a volume which will keep in pleasant memory the Class of '95. If we have 
failed, it will not be because our aspirations were not high enough, or from want of sacrifices 
we have made. Two more remain : E Pluribus unum and Excelsior. The former was a useless 
motto to give us, for has it not always been graven in our hearts, and has it not been the 
leading thought among us? From the Freshman year up to now we have been slowly increasing 
in numbers, and, it is to be hoped, in wisdom ; we have been gradually ascending the Hill of 
Knowledge. Ever onward, upward, has been our march, — in other words, Excelsior 1 Thus have we 
used our gifts ; has it not been to good advantage ? 

As we are about to leave our Junior year, we linger lovingly over its pleasant memories. 
Successes, failures, sunny days and rainy ones, joys and sorrows, follow each other in quick 
succession in our minds, making a lasting and profound impression. There are a few more 
rounds in our ladder ; we know not whether they will be hard to climb or not, but whatever the 
future brings us, we shall have our Junior year to look back upon as one of happiness. And so 
before we reach out for the topmost rounds, we pause, and looking back reluctantly, wave the 
purple banner with our motto: " Palnia non sine labore est/" and, as a last farewell, come 
the words : 

" The thought of our past year in us doth breed 
Perpetual benediction." 

(44) 



"' (bis pomp, 'tis pleasure, and 'tis nonsense all 



T) 



v> en tor Class. 



Motto : " Non nobis soliem sed omnibus." 
Class Color : White and gold. Class Flower : Daisy, 

Honorary Member. 
OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES. 



Helen Boullt Medsker 
Julia W. Anderson 
Alice Noble . 
Rebecca C. Shepherd 



Names. 

Julia W. Anderson 
L. Mabel Case . 
Carolyn E. Oilman 
Daisie A. Hartson 
Julia E. Hogg 
Carrie B. Johnson 
Carrie T. Manning 
Helen B. Medsker 
Alice Noble 
Lotta J. Proctor . 
Jennie M. Rich . 
Orace Robb 
Harriett G. Scott 
Rebecca C. Shepherd 
Gertrude Sherman 
Greta Stearns 
Mollie St. John Taylo 
May Tulleys 
Elizabeth M. Warnock 
Mildred C. Warren 
Virginia Wyckoff 



Pirsideni. 

Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



Residences. 

Taylorville, 111. 

South Manchester, Conn. 

Marshalltown, la. 

Napa, Cal. 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Yonkers, N.Y. . 

Orange, Mass. . 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Tiffin, O. 

Waterville, Me. 

Bethel, Me. 

Toledo, O. 

Wyoming, 111. . 

Auburndale, Mass. 

Wollaston Heights, Mass. 

Wyoming, O. . 

Toledo, O. 

Council Bluffs, la. 

Urbana, O. 

New Boston, N.H. 

Hightstown, N.J. 

(47) 



Rooms. 
60 

4 
66 

43 
22 



64 

40 

25 



25 
28 



13 

4 

62 

Annex 

63 



Mi^forY of tf)e Senior Class. 



BEFORE giving to you the last chapter in our History, let us look back over the preced- 
ing ones ; and in the first we see, in eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, five small maidens, 
with heavy hearts, looking forward to what seemed to them such interminable years of toil 
before they should reach the crowning joy of all their hopes — the Senior year. 

As they glanced around the spacious halls on their way to chapel for the first time, they 
beheld that soul-stirring, labor-inspiring motto — "I ought, therefore I can." A word here, friends. 
Since we are soon to leave this institution, we will tell you a secret. The success of '94 is due 
to the attention it has paid to the many mottoes which have been given by the Faculty, such 
appropriate places upon our walls as incentives to duty. 

Oh, with what a different feeling we entered upon our Freshman year ! The five little 
maids, instead of shedding briny tears at thoughts of home, turned their attention to the new 
members of the class, finding time to smile benignly upon the poor little squelched and withered 
" Preps," and to assure them that time heals all sorrow. Even then we became aware of the 
unusual talent possessed by various members of our class, and then our hopes and pride arose, 
and never have they had cause to fall. 

Realizing that in our Junior and Senior years we must assume more dignity, we determined 
to get all the fun we could during our younger days. In our Freshman year we contented our- 
selves with small exploits, but as we grew older and more learned in our Sophomore year, we 
thoroughly agreed with the Faculty in their lectures on the necessity of exercise. We became 
such enthusiastic advocates of this teaching that we determined to help convert the rest of the 
school, and thereafter joined with the Juniors in illustrating this principle, choosing April 1st as 
a most appropriate day. 

Hark, hark, the dogs do bark ! 

The Lasell girls are out for some fun, 
In fantastic array on this April day, 

Dressed in every thing under the sun. 

148) 



The Faculty, appreciating our interest in exercise, arranged that each day the whole party 
might take a long and speedy tramp. So, day by day, headed by one of their worthy number, 
we made the circuit of Auburndale, West Newton, Newtonville, Newton, and Newton Centre, re- 
turning at nightfall, weary and footsore, but with cleared brains and bounding spirits. There is 
such a thing as too much exercise. The Faculty found it so, and these delightful rambles were 
brought to an end. The rest of the year was devoted mainly to falling in and out of love. 

Twenty-one strong we entered upon our Junior year, feeling not a little pride in our 
numerical strength, to say nothing of the consciousness of intellectual superiority. The publication of 
our Allerlei distinguished us in this year, which book will descend to posterity in, say, its hundredth 
edition, as one of the finest of Lasell's literary productions, and we are confident that its prose and 
poetic effusions cannot be surpassed. 

After much and by no means unfruitful labor upon this work, it was finished at last, and 
we turned our thoughts toward the event of the season, the Senior reception, at which we would 
play no small part. At last that happy eve arrived, and each Junior bravely took up her task of 
steering the trembling youth through the long line of Faculty and Seniors safe to a " Haven of 
Rest" in the hall beyond, where, having soothed his affrighted spirits, he thawed under her genial 
conversation and assured her with what great pleasure he should look forward to the Senior re- 
ception of '94. 

Now that we have " recapitulated " somewhat we will turn to the last chapter of our History, 
— all finished but the last page, which will be written too late for this publication. Our Senior 
year has been devoted mostly to profound study into the mystic lore of all nations ; and thus we 
have had very little time for the frivolities of life. We are very proud of the fact that we are 
the first class at Lasell to present to the public a drama in la langue fran<;aise, from which we 
reaped such financial success that the library was greatly enriched thereby and enough remained to 
help found a college for girls in India. 

We feel the responsibility of our good example in all directions, and we find that every one 
of the class is an active member of the Missionary Society, thereby inspiring with enthusiasm the 
rest of the school to " help the good work along." All can testify to this fact, when they remember 
with what eagerness we bid off the Missionary journals at the paper auction. 

It can but be a matter of self-gratulation that the peculiar individuality displayed by our 
class in its Freshman year has lost none of its originality. There are brilliant representatives in 
the Latin, French, German, Literature, and Scientific departments, while all the arts have many 
interested devotees. A class greater in number and intellect than any that has ever passed through 
the portals of Lasell will go forth this year to surprise the world with the grandeur of its 
achievements. 

(49) 



Irregulars. 



Names. 

Virginia B. Alexander, Lasellia 
Minnie Bachrach, Lasellia 
Ada Barker, Lasellia . 
Nellie G. Bartholomew 
Sara R. Boas 
Nellie M. Briggs, Lasellia 
Edith N. Brodbeck, Lasellia 
Gertrude Bucknum, S.D. 
Alice Burr, Lasellia 
Bertha E. Butterfield 
Blanche E. Cadot 
Anna C. Christi . 
Elizabeth E. Church 
Caroline Church 
Alice W. Clark . 



Residences. 

Keokuk, la. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
South Bay City, Mich. 
Southbridge, Mass. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Boston, Mass. . 
Brookline, Mass. 
Denver, Col. . 
Hartford, Conn. 
Waterville, Me. 
Gallipolis, O. . 
Tarsus, Turkey in Asia 
New York, N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 
Uxbridge, Mass. 
(50) 



Rooms. 
10 
II 

35 
49 

Annex 8 

x 9 
58 
5i 
76 

35 

Annex 1 o 
Annex 10 

• 44 



IRREGULARS. — Continued. 



Names. 

Flora E. Clark . 

Helen W. Cooke, S.D. 

Bessie H. Dana . 

Nettie A. Eldredge, Lasellia 

Fanny V. Fairchild, S.D. . 

Marion B. Fessenden . 

Daisy M. Fischer 

Blanche B. Fowler, Lasellia 

Nora E. Fowler, S.D. 

Rena M. French 

Julia E. Hammond, S.D. 

Euada F. Hance, Lasellia 

Alice J. Houghton, S.D. 

Jessie M. Hunter, Lasellia 

Flora V. Joannes 

Grace A. Johnson 

Jessie J. Johnson, S.D. 

Margaret M. Johnson . 

Annie B. Kerr, Lasellia 

Edith A. Knapp 

Harriet M. Lord 



Residences. 

Boston, Mass. . 
Cincinnati, O. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Portsmouth, N.H. 
Marinette, Wis. 
Townsend, Mass. 
New York, N.Y. 
Chicago, 111. . 
Paris, Tex. 
Chapin, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
North Adams, Mass. 
Toledo, O. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, O. 
Wellesley Farms, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Boston, Mass. . 
Thompsonville, Conn. 
(50 



Rooms. 

56 

43 

9 

M 

23 
20 

9 

52 

Annex 1 
Annex 7 

26 

3i 
36 
15 
5 
67 



Annex 9 



IRREGULARS. — Continued. 



Names. 

Edna Makepeace, Lasellia 
Bertha Merryman, Lasellia 
Grace L. Newland, Lasellia 
Mary D. Parker, S.D. 
Maude A. Parks, Lasellia 
Ettie May Pierson, Lasellia 
Nellie M. Rawson 
Mabel Reed 
Clara A. Roesing, S.D. 
Bessie T. Roper 
Mabel S. Sawyer 
Ruth Seiberling, Lasellia 
Elizabeth S. Shaw, S.D. 
Maud L. Shurtleff, Lasellia 
Laura F. Smith, Lasellia 
Martha M. Solari, Lasellia 
Clara S. Souther, Lasellia 
Edith G. Starkey, Lasellia 
Elizabeth Stevenson, S.D. 
Margaret Stewart, S.D. 
Alice E. Thurstin, Lasellia 



Residences. 

Attleboro', Mass. 
Marinette, Wis. 



Chicago, 111. 



Piqua, O. 
Toledo, O. 
Minneapolis, Minn 
Des Moines, la. 
Sornerville, N.J. 
Chicago, 111. 
Hopedale, Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Akron, O. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Sutton Flat, Quebec 
New Orleans, La. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Foxboro', Mass. 
Marinette, Wis. 
Columbus, O. . 
Toledo, O. 



Rooms. 

• 56 

• 32 
Annex 1 

• 57 
. 6 

Annex 6 

• 55 
Annex 1 

40 
44 

4i 

45 
54 

Annex 1 1 
53 
49 
4i 
20 
48 



IRREGULARS. 



Concluded. 



Names. 

Helen S. Turner 
Anna Walston, S.I). 
Nellie G. Wilber, Lasellia 
Beatrice Casson . 
Maude W. Clark 
Abby S. Hooper 
Bessie S. Latimer 



Residences. 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Decatur, 111. 
Peoria, 111. 
South Boston, Mass. 
Auburndale 
Keene Mills, Me. 
Auburndale, Mass. 



Rooms. 



59 

48 



(53) 



Ifn flfcemoriam. 



SUE ALEXANDER FLATHER, 

Died in May, 18Q3. 



MABELLE AGNES BARNARD, 

Died August 18, r8qs- 



KATHERINE FORSYTH HERR, 

Died in August, 1803. 



MRS. MYRTLE GREENE HARVEY, 

Died in the summer, 1803. 



MRS. JANE HINDE BRADY, 

Died in December, i8q3- 



MAYMIE LEORA BINFORD, 

Died February 28, /Sq4- 



(54) 




'., I,, i Phi If i 



a. d. aoctet^. 



President. 
ELIZABETH McECHRON. 

Vice-President. 

marie Mcdonald. 

Secretary. Treasurer. 

JULIA E. HAMMOND. BELLE BRONSON. 

Ushers. 
DOROTHY MANNING, ELISABETH SHAW. 

Critic. 
RUTH MAC KEOWN. 

Executive Committee. 

ANNIE RICHARDS, ELEANOR R. CLAPP, 

ELIZABETH STEPHENSON. 



Honorary Members. 

Martha E. Ransom, J. Walter Davis, 

Florence Wells, Isabel Shinn, 

Adeline Allen, Louise Putnam. 

(55^ 



MEMBERS OF S. I). SOCIETY. 



Grace L. Allen, 

Julia W. Anderson, 

Alice Andreesen, 

Sara A. Bond, 

K. Belle Bragdon, 
Alice Beesley, 

Belle Bronson, 
Gertrude Bucknum, 

Katherine Bucknum, 

Eleanor R. Clapp, 

L. Mabel Case, 

Helen W. Cooke, 

Mamie Cruikshank, 

Nora E. Fowler, 
Frances V. Fairchild, 
Carolyn E. Oilman, 
Emma H. Goll, 

Daisy A. Hartson, 
Julia E. Hogg, 

Lestra M. Hibberd, 

Julia E. Hammond, 
Olive Healey, 

Louise P. Hubbard, 

Alice J. Houghton, 

Carrie B. Johnson, 

Jess J. Johnson, 



Blanche L. Kelley, 

Bertha A. Lillibridge, 
Mabel M. Lutes, 

Dorothy M. Manning, 

Elizabeth McEchron, 
Helen B. Medsker, 

Annie B. McKeovvn, 
Marie McDonald, 

Mary D. Parker, 

Kate S. Pennell, 

Annie E. Richards, 

Clara A. Roesing, 

Florence A. Ray, 

Bessie Shepherd, 
Elizabeth Stephenson, 
Bessie L. Smith, 

Elizabeth S. Shaw, 

Caroline L. Steel, 

Beulah H. Shannon, 
Grace B. Snyder, 

Margaret Stewart, 
Mabel C. Taylor, 

Virginia Wyckoff, 

Anna P. Warner, 

Anna Walston. 



(56) 




Ih-rlniJ'ln',, 



Lasellia Gab. 



President. 
RUTH SEIBERLING. 

Vice-Presiden t. 
CLARA LEWIS. 



Secretary. 
JOSEPHINE B. CHANDLER. 



Treasurer. 
JESSIE HUNTER. 



Critic. 
CLARA CRESWELL. 



EDITH BLAIR. 



Guards. 
MARIE WILSON. 



ETHEL LOUD. 



NELLIE G. WILBER, 



Executive Committee. 
SARA HAYDEN, 



ANNIE B. KERR. 



Mrs. Annie C. Latimer, 
Herbert L. Rich, 



Honorary Members. 

Elizabeth C. McMartin, 
Henry Orne Ryder, 

(57) 



Joseph A. Hills, 

Willis E. Nowell. 



MEMBERS OF LASELLIA CLUB. 



Virginia B. Alexander, 
Grace Beebe, 

Bertha Butterfield, 
Ada E. Barker, 

Minnie Bachrach, 
Edith Blair, 

Edith M. Brodbeck, 
"Winifred T. Conlin, 

Laura A. Chapman, 

Kittiebel Chapman, 
Clara Creswell, 

Nellie A. Chase, 

Annie F. Gushing, 

Nettie A. Eldredge, 
Blanche Fowler, 

Jessie M. Hunter, 

Euada F. Hance, 
Sara Hayden, 

Marion Josselyn, 

Alice A. Kimball, 

Annie B. Kerr, 
Ida M. Kessinger, 
Clara Lewis, 

Ethel Loud, 

Grace E. Loud, 

Bertha Merryman, 

Carrie T. Manning, 

Helen B. Morris, 



Edna Makepeace, 
Alice Noble, 

Grace L. Newland, 

Maude A. Parks, 

Lotta J. Proctor, 

Eta May Pierson, 
Jennie Rich, 

Grace M. Robb, 

Mabel W. Sawyer, 
Edith Starkey, 

Gertrude Sherman, 
Martha Solari, 

Ruth Seiberling, 

Maude L. Shurtleff, 

Cara A. Sawin, 

Greta Stearns, 

Clara Swift Souther, 

Alice E. Thurstin, 

Mollie S. Taylor, 
Julia Tulleys, 

Mary Tulleys, 

Elizabeth Warnock, 

Emily C. Warner, 

Mildred Warren, 

Anna G. Whitman, 

Nellie G. Wilber, 

Ella W. Wilson, 

Marie Wilson. 



(58) 



" Laselt Leaver." 



"Dux Few iua Facti." 



Published monthly, during the school year, by Lasell Publishing Association. 



FIRST TERM. 

Grace L. Allen, President 

Jennie Rich, Vice-President. 

Grace Robb, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Helen B. Morris. 

Associate Editors. 
Mildred Warren, Alice Noble, 

L. Mabel Case. 



SECOND TERM. 

Greta Stearns, President. 

Gertrude Bucknum, Vice-President. 

Dorothy Manning, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Clara Souther. 

Associate Editors. 

Annie Richards, Nellie Wilber, 

Belle Bronson. 



Local Editor. 
Mollie S. Taylor. 



Exchange Editor. 
Florence A. Ray. 



Local Editor. 
Carrie Johnson. 



Exchange Editor, 
Anna Walston. 



Subscription Agent. 
Caroline Steele. 



Subscription Agent. 
Blanche L. Kelley. 



THIRD TERM. 

Mildred Warren, President. 
L. Mabel Case, Vice-President. Marie McDonald, Secretary 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Clara Creswell. 

Associate Editors. 
Mabel Sawyer, 

Exchange Editor. 
Edith Brodbeck. 

Mary Tullevs, Business Manager. 

(59) 



Edith Starkey, 

Local Editor. 
Helen B. Morris. 



Maude Shurtleff. 



Subscription Agent. 

Anna Cushing. 



Christian Association^. 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Jennie M. Rich . 
Mary Tullevs . 
Rebecca C. Shepherd 

Mrs. W. T. Shepherd 

Lillie M. Packard, <, 
Clara S. Souther, / 
Annie B. Kerr, f 

Carolyn E. Oilman, ) 



President. 
Vice-Presiden t. 
Secretary. 

Treasurer and Corre- 
sponding Secretary. 

Executive Committee. 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR SOCIETY. 



Clara S. Souther 
Edith M. Brodbeck 
Alice W. Clark . 
Hattie L. Freebey 
Bessie T. Roper 
Annie B. Kerb, 1 
Jennie M. Rich, J 
Grace E. Loud, | 

Mildred C. Warren, ( 
Mary Tulleys, 1 
Annie F. Cushing, j 
Ethel D. Loud . 
Bessie S. Hayward 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Lookout Committee. 

|" Prayer Meeting Com- 

< 

\ mittee. 

Music Committee. 

Missio n a ry Co m m it tee. 
Temperance Committee. 



(60) 




Orphean Gab. 



Virginia B. Alexander, 
Grace L. Allen, 
Julia W. Anderson, 
Alice Andreesen, 
Ada Barker, 

K. Belle^Bragdon, 
Flora E. D. Clark, 
Winifred T. Conlin, 
Sara A. Dunham, 
Nettie A. Eldredge, 
Fannie V. Fairchild, 
Nora E. Fowler, 



J. WALTER DAVIS, Leader. 

Hattie L. Freebey, 
Euada F. Hance, 
Lestra M. Hibberd, 
Julia E. Hogg, 

Alice J. Houghton, 
Carrie B. Johnson, 
Grace A. Johnson, 
Ida M. Kessinger, 
Clara Lewis, 

Grace E. Lord, 
Mabel M. Lutes, 
Marie McDonald, 
Josephine Pearl, 

(6n 



Ettiemay Pierson, 
Florence A. Ray, 
Mabel W. Sawyer, 
Harriette G. Scott, 
Bessie L. Smith, 
Martha Solari, 
Grace Snyder, 
Greta Stearns, 

Mabel C. Taylor, 
May Tulleys, 

Nellie G. Wilber, 
Ella W. Wilson. 



Insframenfat Gab. 



Alice Andreesen, 
Martha E. Avery, 
Ada Barker, 

Grace Bartholomew, 
Sara A. Bond, 

K. Belle Bragdon, 
Katherine Bucknum, 
Josephine Burkett, 

Josephine B. Chandler, 
L. Mabel Case, 

Annie F. Cushing, 
Carrie Church, 
Flora E. D. Clark, 
Winifred T. Conlin, 
Mamie Cruikshank, 
Marion B. Fessenden, 
Jane E. Fitch, 

Harriette P. Fitch, 
Daisy M. Fischer, 
Rena M. French, 



JOSEPH A. HILLS, President. 

Carolyn E. Oilman, 
Sara E. Hayden, 
Alice J. Houghton, 
Julia E. Hogg, 

Lestra M. Hibberd, 
Jessie M. Hunter, 
Julia E. Hammond, 
Jessie J. Johnson, 

Grace A. Johnson, 

Flora V. Joannes, 
Marion Josselyn, 



Mr. Willis E. Nowell, 
Grace L. Newland, 
Lotta J. Proctor, 
Kate S. Pennell, 
Florence A. Ray, 
Grace Robb, 
Jeanne L. Royer, 
Rebecca C. Shepherd, 
Beulah Shannon, 

Margaret Stewart, 
Grace Snyder, 



Ida M. Kessinger, 



Martha Solari, 



Bertha A. Lillibridge, 
Clara Lewis, 

Harriet M. Lord, 

Elizabeth McEchron, 
Carrie B. Manning, 
Bertha Merryman, 

Elizabeth C. McMartin, 
Edna Makepeace, 



Gertrude Sherman, 
Clara S. Souther, 
Mabel W. Sawyer, 
Edith Starkey, 
Mabel C. Taylor, 
Anna Walston, 

Mildred C. Warren, 
Ella W. Wilson. 



(62) 



Vocal ©aartet<y 



I. 

Alice J. Houghton, 
Grace L. Allen, 

Helen W. Cooke, 

Fanny V. Fairchild. 



II. 

Winifred T. Conlin, 
Martha Solari, 

Nettie A. Eldredge, 
Clara Lewis. 



Piano-forte @cmrtets. 



Lestra M. Hibberd, 
Annie F. Cushing, 
Lotta J. Proctor, 
Mr. Hills. 



II. 

Alice Andreesen, 
L. Mabel Case, 

Bertha A. Lillibridge, 
Carrie T. Manning. 



III. 

Josephine Burkett, 

Daisy M. Fischer, 

Julia E. Hammond, 
Ella W. Wilson. 



IV. 

Sara A. Bond, 

Edith M. Brodbeck, 

Mamie Cruikshank, 
Jane E. Fitch. 



(63) 



3-D. Glee, P>anjo, i^andottn, Gattar Ctabjs. 



First Sopranos. 

Florence A. Ray, '96, 
Nora E. Fowler, 
Alice J. Houghton, 
Mabel C. Taylor, '95, 
Helen W. Cooke. 



GLEE CLUB. 

K. Belle Bragdon, '95, Leader. 

Second Sopranos. 

Marie McDonald, '95, 
Julia W. Anderson, '94, 
Grace B. Snyder, '96, 
Grace L. Allen, '95, 
Bessie L. Smith, '97. 



Altos. 

Blanche L. Kelley, '96, 
Frances V. Fairchild, 
Alice Andreesen, '95, 
K. Belle Bragdon, '95, 
Elizabeth McEchron. 



Banjos. 
Alice J. Houghton, 
Blanche L. Kelley, '96, 
Florence A. Ray, '96, 
Grace B. Snyder, '96. 



BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR CLUB. 

Elizabeth McEchron, Leader. 

Mandolins. 
K. Belle Bragdon, '95. 
Julia Hammond, 
Bessie L. Smith, '97. 



Guitars. 
Elizabeth McEchron, 
Mary D. Parker, 
Isabel Bronson, '96, 
Jess J. Johnson. 



(64) 



I^asellia Glee, 5 an J°- Mandolin, daifar 



GLEE CLUB. 
Winifred T. Conlin, '97, Leader. 

First Sopranos. 

Euada Hance, 
Ada Barker, 
Cara Sawin, '96, 
Eta May Pierson, 
Mary Tulleys, '94. 

Second Sopranos. 

Greta Stearns, '94, 
Carrie Manning, '94, 
Grace E. Loud, '95, 
Martha Solari, 



Nettie Eldredge. 



First Altos. 
Nellie Wilber, 
Elizabeth Warnock, 
Mabel Sawyer, '95. 



94, 



Second Altos. 

Clara Lewis, 

Ida Kessinger, '97, 

Ella Wilson, '96. 



BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR CLUB. 

Martha M. Solari, Leader. 
First Mandolins. 

Martha M. Solari, 
Virginia Alexander. 

Second Mandolins. 

Edith Brodbeck, 
Edith Blair, '97. 

First Banjos. 

Nettie Eldredge, 
Edith Starkey. 



Second Banjos. 

Ada Barker, 
Mildred Warren, '94. 



Guitars. 

Greta Stearns, '94, 
Maude Parks, 
Ella Wilson, '96, 
Edna Makepeace. 



(65) 



Dre^S Catting. 



MINNIE BACHRACH, 

JULIA E. HAMMOND, 

GRACE L. NEWLAND, 

ETA MAY PIERSON. 



^tenograpl)^. 



MABEL REED, 

BESSIE ROPER, 

EDITH STARKEY, 

ALICE E. THURSTIN. 

(66) 




7^€3 y /-<_ p>j>.*& 



Cooking Classes. 



THIRD YEAR. 

Alice Andreesen, Alicia Noble, 

Sara A. Boni>, Lotta J. Proctor, 

K. Belle Bragdon, Jennie M. Rich, 

Carolyn E. Gilman, Florence A. Ray, 

Bertha A. Lillibridge, Rebecca C. Shepherd, 

Grace E. Loud, May Tulleys, 

Virginia Wyckoff. 

SPECIALS. 
Ada Barker, 

Laura A. Chapman, 

Kittiebel Chapman, 

Eleanor R. Clapp, 

Annie F. Gushing, 

Emma H. Goll, 

Clara A. Roesing. 
C67) 




Lasdl B&tlalion. 



OFFICERS. 



Acting Major . 
Acting Adjutant 
Acting Sergeant-major 



Captain Oilman. 
Lieutenant Ray. 
Sergeant Steel. 



Sergeants. 
Orace E. Loud, 
(trace L. Allen, 
Julia E. Hogg. 



Sergeants. 
Caroline L. Steel, 
Bertha A. Lillibridge, 
Elizabeth McEchron. 



COMPANY A. 

Captain, Alice Andreesen. 
Lieutenant, Florence A. Ray. 



COMPANY B. 

Captain, Carolyn E. Gilman. 
Lieutenant, Mollie S. Taylor. 



Corporals. 
Winifred Conlin, 
Lotta Proctor, 
Jennie M. Rich. 



Corporals. 

Josephine B. Chandler, 
Carrie T. Manning, 
Grace M. Robb. 



(68) 



Tf)e (Jma^on — Ancient and Modern. 



THE ANCIENT. 

ON the Babylonian ramparts, where the sculptured lions are, 
Looking northward, ever northward, sleepless as the polar star, 
High above the hanging gardens, where the slaves in chorus sing, 
Watching o'er the sleeping city, pace the sentries of the king. 

On the Babylonian ramparts, where the sculptured lions are, 
Long they wait the news from northward, couriers from the seat of war; 
Eor again from far-off Scythia, with a tread that shakes the plain, 
Come the Amazonian warriors, leaving ruin in their train. 

Mighty maidens clad in wolf-skins, armed with sword and spear and bow, 
Stiong of limb and fiercely fighting, and relentless to the foe, — 
Ah ! good reason we should tremble, as we wait the coming war, 
On the Babylonian ramparts, where the sculptured lions are. 

Bright the temple fires are burning, red the sacrificial stone, 

High on Babel priests are praying, in the river gems are thrown, 

All too few are we to meet them — gods alone can help us now, 

And with sinking hearts we'll greet them from the ramparts' rugged brow. 

What that whir upon the night- wind? Ah, the shaft has pierced my steel, 
And I feel my life-blood flow as to the signal-fire I reel ; 
And the shadows close about me, here above the rush of war, 
On the Babylonian ramparts, where the sculptured lions are. 

(69) 



THE MODERN. 

We have met them in Dahomey, we have seen them on the stage, 
We have met them on the Midway, where they seemed to be the rage, 
But we never in our lifetime thought to see them in a school, 
Where a stern and warlike Major gently swayed them 'neath his rule. 

Minus swords and minus lances, minus fight and minus foes, 
Still for darts they have their glances, still they fix them on their beaux 
Other weapons now they need not, we all know as well their power 
As the Babylonian sentry, trembling on his moonlit tower. 

Dresses now instead of wolf-skins, just 'steen inches round the waist, 
Hardly Amazonian measure, though, of course, they never laced, 
As they march in dainty slippers, on the floor the French heels ring, 
While the Boston five-inch limit seems to be the proper thing. 

W T ere I wafted to Olympus, where good Amazonians go, 

I should like to hear the comments on the antics here below, — 

I should like to see them fainting as they heard the moderns talk, 

While their chieftain faintly murmurs, " Oh, great Zeus, see that walk ! " 

(70) 



itttdio. 




Gertrude Bucknum, 
Ellen A. Chase, 

Winifred T. Conlin, 
Maud Clark, 

Abby Hooper, 

Carrie B. Johnson, 
Annie B. Kerr, 
Bessie S. Latimer, 
Grace E. Loud, 
L. Mabel Sawyer, 
Mabel C. Taylor, 
Anna P. Warner. 



(70 




IvQSell at ff)€ World's Pair. 



ONE day last summer, while visiting the World's Fair, I chanced to meet a friend, and 
during the conversation she asked me what place or building interested me most. With- 
out a thought or hesitation, I replied, "Come with me and see." This she was quite 
willing to do, so we started out. 

After a short walk, we stopped in front of the Woman's Building, a structure worthy in 
every respect to bear such a dignified name. As we entered, we turned to the right and went 
up the stairs. To be sure there were elevators, but they were more for looks than for use, as 
they almost always had a placard on them, "Not running to-day." As we slowly made our way 
through the crowd, my friend kept plying me with questions, as to what we were going to see, 

(72) 



which was more wonderful than everything else at the Fair ; but I gave her no satisfaction, feeling 
assured that she would be fully repaid for her long walk. At the farther end of the building, we 
entered a large room ; this again was divided into many sections. " But," said my friend, " what 
is here to interest us?" Ah, that was the important thing, as she soon perceived. We came 
to a little triangular room or booth, which looked so dainty and home-like with its pretty light- 
blue draperies. Over the entrance were the words, " Lasell Seminary for Young Women, Auburn- 
dale, Massachusetts." " Come," said I, " we will not stand outside, for as I am a Lasell girl, I 
am privileged to go in whenever I wish to rest, and to invite my friends." How charmingly it 
was decorated, and what a luxury to be able to rest in an easy-chair, after tramping over the 
grounds all day ! The woodwork was ivory white with panels representing the different depart- 
ments of the school, such as art, science, music, gymnastics, and the like. In one corner was a 
little white desk, fitted out with all the materials necessary for writing ; here, also, there was a 
large book, in which each girl registered her name and address, while in Chicago. Over the 
mantel were photographs of the principal rooms in the Seminary, and some geometrical and 
botanical specimens, the work of the pupils. In order to make it seem more natural, Mr. Brag- 
don had arranged to have some one there from the Seminary all the time, to welcome the girls 
as they came. This day, Miss Emma was there, and was as smiling and pleasant as usual. I 
explained to my friend how important a factor Miss Emma was at Lasell, and how great was the 
temptation, every time we saw her, to inquire for the long-looked-for letter. At different times 
during the summer Mrs. Shepherd and Miss Ransom were there to receive the old Lasellians, 
while some of the girls had the extreme pleasure of meeting Mr. Bragdon's brother. After I had 
told my friend of some of our good times, she regretted she was not one of us, and admitted 
that I had sufficient reason for considering this the most charming spot at the Fair. 

At the close of the Exposition, the booth was transferred to the studio in the Seminary, 
and those who had not the good fortune to see it in its first beauty, are now enabled to enjoy 
it here. 

(73) 




Lasett's Circulating Library. 



Open 6 to 7.30 A.M. and 9.30 to i 



P.M. 



When I was in Paris. Mis. Strong. 
Concentration ; or, The Automatic Hymn Learner. 
How to get Fat. F. V. Fairchild. 
When I was in Egypt and Palestine ; with full set 

of maps of Palestine. C. C. Bragdon. 
Sarcasm; or, The Carpenter's Tool. Mr. Anon. 
The Retreat of the Curling-iron ; or, The Vanished 

Match. 
Cood-by to the Bakery Wagon ; or, The Welcome 

Cracker. 



A " Rich " Mormon lost in Boston with his Twelve 
Wives. Edited and annotated by a Senior. 

* How Strong got me. Sequel to How to get 

Strong. 
Elementary Dogmatics. G. M. Steele. 

Latest edition of "The Heavenly Twins," dedi- 
cated to Misses Wilson and Blair. 

Puns, a little perverted, but still in Use. J. Hills. 

Art, for Art's Sake. Miss Titian's latest book. 

Aid to Conversation. A. B. Blaisdell. 



* No disrespect to Mr. Blaikie's book. 



Uses of Paint. H. Orne Ryder. 

How the Snake died in an Agony of Wriggling. A 
treatise on Geology. By E. Warnock. 

Tennyson's Maud ; or, The School-girl's Friend. 



The Dissipated Boiler ; or, The Flight of Hot H,(). 

"Truth" Prohibited; or, Falsehood Encouraged. 

The Life of Fly-specked Goldsmith, the Apothe- 
cary's Drug. Murphy edition. 



RULES. 

After using books, please put back in proper places. Please do not injure books by too frequent use. Our choice 
books please handle only with clean hands. 

Gossiping is positively prohibited in library. Do not study in library unless using books of reference. 
Please throw away all chewing-gum and candy before entering library. 

NOTICES. 

Last year, only one librarian was needed, but this year, owing to the great increase in the number of books, one 
hundred and fifty librarians are barely sufficient. The new system has proved so satisfactory that patrons of library have 
found books more accessible this year than in any previous one. 

Young ladies are doing remarkably well at present in regard to keeping library in order, nevertheless, a little more 
care may be taken in the reading-room with newspapers and magazines. 



(75) 



Civil Government. 



A 



S I sat in my seat in chapel, 

Reciting to Dr. Steele, 

My teeth began to chatter 

And I shook from head to heel. 



II. 

As he talked and asked me questions, 
Every thought flew out of my head, 

And I began to greatly wonder 
If it was made of lead. 



III. 

" Well, you ought to know this answer, 
It's here in the book," said he ; 

At this my heart stopped beating 
And I could scarcely see. 



IV. 

" The next may answer the question." 
Oh, great was my knowledge now ! 

But how shall I conquer my dullness? 
I pray thee, tell me how ! 
(76) 



TI)e doner. 



WHEN, early in the morning, 
We're in dreamland far away, 
Little thinking of the dawning 
Of still another day, 
We are suddenly awakened 

By a sound both loud and long 
(That noise can't be mistaken), — 
It's the usual rising gong. 

We are still so very weary, 

It's such trouble to arise, 
This thought is — oh, so dreary ! 

Yet the time just fairly flies, 
And startled are we greatly 

When the breakfast gong doth call. 
Our manners are not stately 

As we rush down stairs and hall. 




r JMl-rS Ttyirr. 



Our toilets we've not finished, 

For we fear that we'll be late, 
Then our money'll be diminished, 

Five cents we're fined that date. 
And excuses we must offer, 

Though very poor they be, 
We sometimes have to suffer, 

As our reason's hard to see. 



This sound we welcome gladly, 

When at dinner-time 'tis heard, 
Never feeling one bit badly 

That our tasks are now deferred. 
And we come to the conclusion, 

That in spite of everything, 
There'd be a great confusion 

If this gong didn't ring. 



(77) 



Senior 5^tsttcs. 



NAME. 


1 
Alias. 


Wei glit of Brain. 


Dis- 
position. 


Singularity. 


Haunts. 


Highest Ambition. 


Wedding 
Bells. 


Julia W. Anderson .... 


" Little 
Julia." 


Quality, 
not quantity. 


i, J 


Little waist. 


In all 

our thoughts. 


To be imposing. 


Tinkling. 


L. Mabel Case 


" Queen 
Mab." 


Incalculable. 


Sheep's eyes. 


Houghtie's room. 


To wink at 
the man in the moon. 


Clanging. 




r 




Carolyn E. Gilman . . . 


•' Cad." 


Colossal. 


India-rubber 
digestive organs. 


Dining-room. 


To eat a leviathan. 


Sexton 
asleep. 


Dasie R. Hartson .... 


" Dai." 


i lb. 


Flexibility of 
tongue. 


Blanche's 
embrace. 


To be known as 
a Senior. 


(Too 
young.) 


Julia E. Hogg 


" Mile. 
Couchon." 


Uncertain. 


Love of work. 


In the arms 
of Morpheus. 


To marry one who 
knows less than herself. 


Silent. 


Carrie B. Johnson .... 


"Miss 
Johnsing." 


Lacking. 


Willard. 


Dress-makers. 


To have a dressing sack 
like Miss Carpenter's. 


Pealing. 


Carrie T. Manning .... 


"Carol." 


Immense in her 
own estimation. 


Entirely 
harmless. 


Practice-rooms. 


To rule the roost. 


Clapper 
gone. 


Helen B. Medsker .... 


" Simply 
Helen." 


None 
to speak of. 


Heavenly voice. 


In the mirror. 


To be a hand-organ 
man's monkey. 


Out of tune. 


Alice Noble 


" Nobie." 


ToTo oz - 


Manners. (?) 


Fraulein's room. 


To have plenty of room 
for locomotion. 


Worn out. 


Lotta J. Proctor 


" Lot." 


Never had any. 


Stale puns. 


No place 
good enough. 


To be the 
Faculty's soup. 


Need 
oiling. 


Jennie M. Rich 


"Jen." 


Poor. 


Tender voice. 


Within herself. 


To star for a season. 


Echoing. 


Grace Robb 


" Robbie." 


Stolen. 


Lofty ideas. 


Prayer meeting. 


To be a 

walking bulletin. 


Stuck. 


Harriet G. Scott 


" Scottie." 


Medium. 


Pigeon-toed. 


Wash-woman's. 


To be mistress 
of the White House. 


Beginning. 


Rebecca C. Shepherd . . 


" Reby." 


Increasing. 


Monopoly 
of the virtues. 


Near the 
bakery wagon. 


To have her walls 
covered with "Truth." 


Too faint to 
be heard. 


Gertrude Sherman .... 


" Polly." 


5 lbs. 


Parler Francais. 


"Tech." 


To have a 
tapering waist. 


Prefers 
schoolbells. 


Greta Stearns 


" Greed." 


Variable. 


Death to 
" Instructor." 


Laboratory. 


To have the 
proposal by moonlight. 


Rich tones. 


Mollie S. Taylor 


" Mol." 


Too small 
to be measured. 


Admiration for 
masculine sex. 


Nutt-crackers. 


To accidentally come out 
Mondays on the 3.05 train. 


Cracked. 


May Tulleys 


" May." 


Startling. 


Unadulterated 
goodness. 


A mystery. 


" Queen of the ballet." 


Jingling. 


Elizabeth Warnock . . . 


" Vandy." 


Unknown 
quantity. 


h 


H 

H 


Number of 
her conquests. 


" Harvard." 


To be married. 


Knelling. 


Mildred C. Warren . . . 


" Millie." 


4 ilbs. 


Fondness for 
Mlle. 


Wherever she 
can be useful. 


To equal " Paddy." 


In the 
distance. 


Virginia Wyckoff . . . . 


" Moon- 
face." 


Broke the scales. 




Argumentative 
turn of mind. 


In realms of 
thought. 


To ride on a cloud. 


Bellowing. 



(78) 



Tf)e Mentor Class. 



MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. 



I. 

IN all the annals of the world, 
In ancient times of yore, 
There ne'er has been a year like this, 
Of eighteen ninety-four. 
So many marvels have ta'en place 

We cannot name them all, 
And some great truths we thought were so, 
Have sadly had a fall. 



III. 

Of all this great and mighty throng 

You surely wish to hear, 
So read but this and you will have 

Of each a clear idea. 
The first who enters on the scene 

Used jolly once to be, 
But from that state she now has changed 

To solemn dignity. 



II. 



We have been taught since we were 
born 

That there were wonders seven, 
But now we know that is not true, 

One more is sent from Heaven, 
Which greater is than all the rest, 

And doth them all by far surpass, 
It is, — with awe we say the name, — 

Of Ninety-four, the 

SENIOR CLASS! 




IV. 

She once was captain in the drill, 

Until her lectures grand 
Brought such renown that time was 
scant 

To satisfy demand. 
She makes the little Freshmen 
quake, 

And of their sins repent, 
But Ninety-four may well be proud 

Of their great president. 



(79) 




V. 

The archives of this mighty class 

Are kept in writing clear 
By one who left us for a time, 

And to us all is dear. 
The Seniors, they are very glad 

She has returned once more ; 
In "Ethics" she's a brilliant light, 

As was in " Psych." of yore ! 




9-e.t 



VI. 



The Seniors chose their treasurer well, 

She hoards their wealth with care ; 
With solemn dignity and awe 

She doth the great trust bear. 
On Sundays to the church she goes 

To teach in Sunday-school, 
And in the future she may go 

To give the pagans Christian rule. 




VII. 

In studio there one excels 

Who from New York doth come ; 
Her paintings are most beautiful, 
They'd bring her quite a sum. 
But other thoughts her mind en- 
gross, — 
Those of her clothes so dear, 
«j. Of satins, silks, and velvets fine, 
Of muslins soft and sheer. 

VIII. 

There ne'er could be a class so large 

Without one wondrous freak, 
And of this startling number now 

We will proceed to speak. 
She eats 'til she can eat no more ; 

And we do sit and wonder 
How can she e'er contain so much, 

That Senior Anaconda ! 

IX. 

In music there can none like her 

Bring forth melodious sound, 
Her harmony is simply grand, 

So full and sweet and round. 
Her wisdom is both great and wide ; 

Oh, she doth study well ! 
And teachers smile with calm delight 

As they her exploits tell. 




(80) 




•^ 



**4 



X. 



There's one who high and mighty is, 

And ne'er on fun is bent ; 
She thinks the world was made for her, 

And with it is content. 
She looks around with noble mien, 

Her head it is so high, 
We wonder if 'twill e'er come down 

And, trembling, pass her by. 

XI. 

If, 'spite these closely 
%> guarded doors, 
& Prince Charming 
y should get through, 
The sleeping beauty 
he would find 
In Number Twenty-two. 
Fair Julia doth delight in rest, 

All work is but a bore, 
And yet her lessons she doth know, 
For she's as bright as four. 








XII. 

Still waters do indeed run deep, 

Is what we often think, 
When into Mabel's face we gaze 
And see that maiden wink ! 
You ne'er would think it, 
but we hear, 

On best authority, 

X That Ninety- 

"^1./ It, four's first 

blushing bride 

E'en Mabel C. will be. 




XIII. 

From her we dare not separate 

A friend to her so dear, 
For when the former one is seen, 

We know the latter's near. 
Of science she is very fond, 

And doth in this branch lead ; 
In knowledge of the earth and sky 

She's very rich indeed. 



(Si) 



XIV. 
<(jPfM And by some charm 




to us unknown 
She always has some 
flowers ; 
To make them grow 
in winter-time 
She must tax all 
her powers. 
But it is said, tho' 
such a word 
To speak we hardly dare, 
That M. S. T., with all her smiles, 
Is fickle as she's fair. 

XV. 

Among these bril- 
liant twenty-one 
Is found a second Terry, 
In mimicry she doth excel, 
In acting, — clever, very ! 
And in this line her fame 
she'll make, 
For some day on the stage 
The name of Warnock will be great, 
And she will be the rage. 





XVI. 

The jolly one of all the 
crowd 
Has eyes so twinkling 
bright, 
That even when to church 
she goes 
They dance with all 
their might. 
Of dignity she's not a 

speck, 'J 

But dearly loves to / ■ 
laugh, \l 

And all who hear her ' 

sparkling wit ^/V^P 

Do turn away in wrath. 



XVII. 

\One entered as a Sophomore, 
And proved herself quite 
smart, 
But finding Junior work be- 
neath her, 
From her own class did 
part. 
But as the Senior year drew nigh 

They felt great need of her ; 

So she came back to shine aloft, 

And be their brightest ster* 

* Obsolete form of star. 




(82) 




We now will group together three, 

The shy maids of the class ; 
We dare not speak of each apart, 

So lightly '11 o'er them pass. 
Virginia is extremely smart, 

But hardly dares to speak, 
While Harriet is studious, 

And Tennie mild and meek. 




XIX. 

The best musicians of the school 
Are found among their number, 

Their music is both grand and fine, 
Their technique our great wonder. 




wlf'f f 



When Carrie soft and low doth play, 

We're lost in admiration, 
While Lotta's forte is power untold, 

And Mildred's, animation. 

XX. 

Of Greta S. much could be said, 

If only we had room, 
How she, when wisdom fails in class, 

Doth knowing airs assume. 
"She is a girl intelligent," 

Of Grace, said Dr. Steele ; 
" 'Tis not a fact self-evident, 

But one which we must feel!" 

XXI. 

The last one to be mentioned here 

Is queen of all the song, 
E'en Patti doth, in trembling, fear 
May '11 take her place e'er long. 
She never naughty is and bad, 

And in these years four 
< \' ^%k 'Tis safe to say she ne'er 

has been 
To any candy store. 





«- 



(83) 



XXII. 

And now we're through ; we've told you some 

Of this large, brilliant class, 
But all their virtues you can't know 

Until you meet each lass. 
We've not been harsh, but simply laid 

Before the public gaze 
Some failings and some fancies few 

Of twenty-one bright maids. 



XXIII. 

One word before we say good-bv 

To you of Ninety-four : 
We wish to say how queer 'twill seem 

When you are here no more. 
But when the wide, wide world claims you, 

And you go from Lasell, 
Remember that in all you do 

Your mates will wish you well ! 



XXIV. 

We now will end this rambling tale, 

Although much could be said, 
But fear your patience will give out 

When all this you have read. 
So fare you well, O Ninety-four, 

We hope you'll come again 
To visit us in old Lasell ; 

To this all say : Amen ! 



(8 4 ) 



Tlje Topical Lasell Girt 



T 



HE Lasell girl is a very bright girl, 
Few are as bright as she, 
For at the " Sem " there's much to learn, 
And just as much to see. 
Of language she is very fond 

(French, German, Latin, Greek), 
And, also, English she is taught, 
So must correctly speak. 



This Lasell girl is a studious girl, 

Few are as studious as she, 
For Science, History, and Literature 

Are hard as hard can be. 
Mathematics she does not neglect, 

Nor is Psychology missed, 
Political Economy, and Ethics, too, 

Are down upon the list. 

The Lasell girl is a musical girl, 

As musical as can be, 
For she can sing and play a piece, 

So very classically. 
This maid excels in painting, too, 

It is her favorite art, 
Much time she spends in studio, 

And works with all her heart. 

The Lasell girl is a practical girl, 

As practical as can be, 
For she can sew, and sweep, and dust, 

As well as cook the tea. 




And drilling she does understand, 
With either sword or gun, 

While swimming and gymnastics, 
For her, are such great fun. 

The Lasell girl is a jolly girl, 

None are as jolly as she, 
Good times are ever in store for her, 

As all can plainly see. 
So, taking all in all, this maid 

Full many things can do. 
Pray, think this not exaggerated, 

For what Eve said is true. 



(85) 




A Freeman's Letter 
Home. 



M 



and 



Lasell. 

Y Dear Ma, I am at a historical party and 
I brought my text, reference and blank 
books but I don't seem to need them 
I don't feel as if J ought to look. The 
girls are all drest pretty and they do a funny 
thing called dancing. I wish I could, but I sup- 
pose its wicked. When the piano goes they all divide in pairs and the ones drest like men 
put their arms way round the girls and they whirl and bump till they are tired, then after a little 
rest they go and get someone else and do it again. Its awful pretty, I guess its easy but you 
have to be awful strong and say Ma I don't feel exactly well, I think I have got consumpshun but 
praps the food is too rich we have lovely things to eat. Once we had oyster soop, least ways I 
guess it was coz I found heaps of shells in mine we had meat and greens chopped up with some- 
thing over it, after that came cake and beeten egg made in a round sandwich in a paper box 
they called it Charlotte's roosh. The last two was awful good and I ate lots, the next day I 
didn't go to gym. and I was dretful sorry. Sometimes we play basket ball its real nice when 
you don't fall down. I did onct and I seen pretty stars and a noise " as of the rushin of many 
waters." Say Ma I don't like Sophs, they say we are green. I ain't, I know I ain't. I love my 
dear teachers. Has the cow got over her cough yet? Hows the minister? Did you have a hen 
to eat Sunday? we had a bouncer, but she was hard to chew. I believe I am real pretty 
because people seem to notice me. I hope Pa and you are well and don't mind me being un- 
comfortable becaus I don't think I shall last long. I do want to come home. I wish you would 
send me a V but if you can't spare it no matter. I guess I can borrow it of a girl who is 
going to leave Easter. She won't come back so I won't have to pay up. 

Your reched daughter 

A. P. W. 

(86) 




TH>lr<- 



> n^' r 



5^Qasf)es. 



Blanche Kelley 

Josephine Chandler 
Kitty Pennell 



Annie Kerr 
Clara Souther 



f Beulah Shannon 
| Florence Ray 



Mame Cruikshank 
Bertha Lillibridge 



Mollie Taylor 
Edith Starkey 



f Mabel Case 

) Alice Houghton 



Carrie Johnson 
Grace Snyder 



f Julia Hogg 
I Alice Noble 



f Carrie Manning 
[ Polly Sherman 



Maude Parks 
Cara Sawin 



f Elizabeth Church 
Harriet Lord < 

[ Carrie Church 

f Miss Shinn 

[ Julia Anderson 



Miss McMartin 



Mabel Case 
Beulah Shannon 



f Greta Stearns 

( Elizabeth Warnock 



Edith Blair 
Marie Wilson 



Mildred Warren 
Bessie Roper 



(87) 



h&Z% Girls' Ctob. 



Laziest of the Lazy (President) 
Lazier ( Vice-President) 
Lazy (Secretary) 



Ada Barker. 
Lestra M. Hibrerd. 

Alice Noble. 



MEMBERS. 

Florence A. Ray, 
Emma M. Goll, 
Martha Solari, 
Julia E. Hogg, 
Virginia Alexander, 
Margaret Stewart, 
Nan Walston, 
Daisie Hartson, 
Blanche E. Fowler, 




Miss Packard, 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Mlle. Le Royer, 
r88) 



MEMBERS. 

EUADA HaNCE, 

Nellie Wilbur, 
Alice Thurstin, 
Blanche L. Kelley, 
Mary D. Parker, 
Jess J. Johnson, 
Olive Healey, 
Elizabeth Stephenson, 
Minnie Bachrach. 



Fraulein Roth. 



(3 Didactic Tale. 



o 



NE day a Senior meeting 

Was held in Number Two. 
Could you have seen the mighty airs, 
It would have frightened you. 
The President with haughty mien 

Presided o'er the rest ; 
To keep assumed grandeur 
She bravely did her best. 




"\ 



But oh, ye readers, understand 

That 'tis not always so, 
A very different sight you'd see 

If unexpected there you'd go. 
In practice-room, on trunks and floor, 

They gracefully recline, 
Their hair in papers done up tight, 

They're clad in bath-robes fine. 



Moral. 

Oh, Seniors, from this tale take heed, 
And list to what we teach : 

If you'd be great upon this earth, 
Then practise what you preach. 



(§9) 




"THE IDEAL" 



THE REAL 



^ 



La^etl Canoe Gab. 



GRETA STEARNS . 
BERTHA A. LILLIBRIDGE 
ALICE ANDREESEN 
NELLIE G. WILDER . 
MARTHA E. RANSOM . 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. 
T7'easurer. 
Captain. 



CHARTER MEMBERS. 



Alice Andreesen, '95, 

K. Belle Bragdon, '95, 
L. Mabel Case, '94, 
Daisy M. Fischer, 

Carolyn Gilman, '94, 
Euada F. Hance, 

Lestra M. Hibberd, '96, 
Julia E. Hogg, '94, 

Carrie B. Johnson, '94, 
Grace A. Johnson, 



Bertha A. Lillibridge, '95, 
Alice Noble, '94, 

Martha E. Ransom, 
Elizabeth S. Shaw, 

Rebecca C. Shepherd, '94, 
Gertrude Sherman, '94, 
Greta Stearns, '94, 
Alice Thurstin, 
Anna Walston, 
Nellie Wilber. 



(90 



Concentration. 



" Stately and tall she moves in the hall, 
The chief of a thousand for grace." 

ALL the world admires a graceful woman, and in order to obtain a graceful carriage and an 
easy manner Miss Call reminds us to forget ourselves, which is, perhaps, the most difficult 
thing a Lasell girl, or any other girl, in fact, could be asked to do. 

But if you go with us into the Gymnasium some Wednesday afternoon you will readily see 
how we are taught to " relax,''' and "let go." As we enter we will find the girls seated Turk 
fashion in a circle on the floor, with Miss Call in the centre. About the first thing that greets 
our ears is: "Miss Call, if I have five lessons to learn, and only twenty-five minutes in which to 
learn them, how in the world am I to do it?" — "Miss B., will you please answer that question 
for Miss R.?" 

"Well, I should say, < let go,' learn them if you can, but if not, don't worry." 

Again we hear such questions as these : 

"When Miss Carpenter asks me a question and I don't know it, what am I to do?" — 
" When I am walking down the church aisle and am fully conscious that it is I, how can I 
relax? " 

These and the many other questions that are asked are answered by the one sentence, 
" Girls, forget yourselves." 

Next comes the quick relaxing. The girls arrange themselves in lines on either side of the 
room and are told to feel quiet — quieter than they ever felt before; again, to feel tall — a veri- 
table pine-tree. From this position each girl suddenly falls to the floor, senseless, lifeless, and 
thoughtless ; but if we picture them truly it must be told that there are always one or two who 
slyly peek through their fingers to see what their neighbors are doing. 

(92) 



For the last few lessons special attention has been paid to the cultivation of a soft voice 
with an effort to counteract the effect which the exciting game of tennis seems to produce, when 
some voices might easily be heard at the Boston & Albany station. 

This style of training is of such practical use at all times. For instance, if we are inclined 
to cough during the sermon, we are told to relax. Does this mean that we are to get down on 
the floor and go through all those frantic movements? 

If the leader who has charge of the boy choir at the Episcopal Church had been instructed 
in this mysterious art, he would have a remedy for the uncontrollable laughter with which boys 
are afflicted when they are forced to sit in the choir and see — the Lasell girls make doll babies 
out of their handkerchiefs ; for Miss Call says if we are not able to control our laughter we 
must follow this simple rule. Stop immediately, take three deep breaths, and the desire for 
laughing will be entirely removed. The class in nerve-training has now come to be an established 
thing at Lasell, and no branch of work is more enjoyed by the students. 




(93) 



TI)ree FJnigfyts of tl)e Round Table. 



LISTEN, my readers, and you shall hear 
The tale of three professors dear. 
On the second of April, ninety-four, 
Things changed from what they were of yore, 
And peace was lost forevermore. 



As to her lunch each girl was bound, 
She saw a sight she'll ne'er forget. 
Before her was the table round, 
And on it dainty viands set. 
Each and all did sit and ponder 
Upon this great and lasting wonder, 
By every girl the word was sent, 
Asking what this marvel meant, 
And on that sight each eye was bent. 



When slowly down with measured tread 
The gallant knights came to be fed, 
And when they saw that table round, 
They stood and uttered not a sound. 
Dismay was on their faces writ, 
They writhed and almost had a fit, 
Their brows with awful frowns were knit ; 
At last each sank into his seat, 
And heavy hearted 'gan to eat. 



And there they are until this day, 
Their faces thin, their hair grown gray, 
To friends and maidens they've forsook 
They cast full many a longing look. 
And as the years roll slowly by, 
In this same place they'll still be found, 
Sir Davis, Ryder, and Sir Hills, 
Three Knights of this small Table Round. 

(94) 




^londa^ horning. 



N Monday morn 'tis our delight 
And duty, don't you know, 

To sweep our floors and — 
dust our rooms, 
Then off to Boston go. 



There's a turmoil in the hallway, 

And shouts in every tone, 
And you're welcome every Monday morn 

To see us sweep our home. 




We wash our bowls and pitch- 
ers clean 
Until they're sure to shine, 
And then we change our sweep- 
ing garb 
To gowns both soft and fine. 





There's a turmoil in the hallway 
And shouts in every tone, 

And you're welcome every Mon 
day morn 
To see us sweep our home. 



llwi 



MIFF 



(95) 






? 



DID those boys call on Miss Pearl and Miss Hayward, February twelfth? 
Why does Miss Th-rst-n think of Mormons in connection with purgatory? 
Bright Girl, to caller: "Have you passed your 'midways,' yet?" 
Did Lohengrin sing at the Grand Opera? Inquire of G- L-ud. 

Member of the Senior class, on looking at a piece of Pentelic marble: "What is it? Something to 
eat?" 

Teacher: "What does D. O. M. mean?" 
Bright Senior : " Dominum Optimum Maximus." 

Ask J. H-gg how she enjoys sleeping on laundry-bags. 

Why didn't Mrs. Cody (Buffalo Bill's wife) appear in Mrs. General Custer's place ? 
Ask J. J-hns-n. 

Why does Mrs. Strong fear snakes ? 

(D. T.) 
Teacher: "What nationality was Shelley, Miss C. ? " 
Miss C. : " I'm not sure, but I think he was an American." 

Brilliant class, reciting Tennyson's " Idyls of the King." 

Teacher: "Miss C, what is an idyl?" 

Answer: "A thing that gods worship." 
In cooking-class. 

Teacher: "Did you ever eat a fish's tongue?" 

Girl: "Fish don't have tongues." 

Where did M-ud- P-rk-s spend the night, February first? 

(96) 



A Psalm of Life. 



NEW VERSION BY R. K. 







TELL me not in joyful accent, 
Life is but a happy dream, 

For all my days are full of sorrow, 
And things are never as they seem. 



Life is real, life is earnest, 

And never merry can I be, 
When the thought to me returnest 

Of Hallo'een in ninety-three. 

Not enjoyment, but much sorrow, 
Came to me that awful night, 

For Lou and I the gong did hide, 
And thereby got into a plight. 

Art is long, and time is fleeting, 

So when the naughty deed was done, 

To our rooms we gayly hied us, 

And laughed to think of all our fun. 



Trust no future, howe'er pleasant, 

For you often do get left, 
And on that night I saw a sight 

Which of my senses me bereft. 

In the world's broad field of battle 
Ne'er was seen a sight like this ; 

For on my couch I saw a figure, 
And knew that something was amiss. 

Let me, then, be up and doing, 
'Tis no time to stand and wait ; 

Courage, then, to me returning, 
I advanced to know my fate. 

'Twas so dark I could not see her, 
So I spoke, — she answered not ; 

Then up the light I turned upon her, 
Oh, dreadful moment, — I was caught ! 



(97) 



For Mrs. S. had heard a noise, 

And thinking it was caused by me, 

Up to my room had quickly come 
The reason for all this to see. 

And, as she found me not at home, 
She calmly waited my return, 

Of my misconduct me to ask, 
And of my naughtiness to learn. 

But, as I told her what I'd done 
With that old horrid gong, 

She bade me, with an awful frown, 
To put it where it did belong. 



And when she left me quite alone 

With Mary, my dear mate, 
I did repent of what I'd done, 

Ah, me, 'twas then too late ! 

I've told you all this simple tale 

To teach a lesson true : 
Next year, when Hallo'een comes 'round 

Be careful what you do. 

For all your actions, whether they 

Be bad or be sublime, 
Can't be recalled, and leave behind 

Footprints on the sands of time ! 




(98) 



Tf)e I^-Worm. 



T 



HREE times a day to meals he comes, 

His head deep in a book, 
And while he eats he sits and reads, 

At no one does he look. 
His books are varied at each time, — 

The morn he reads the news, 
At lunch his science he devours, 

The magazines at eve pursues. 

And when he finds a choice, rare bit, 

Such as, To-day 'tis sure to rain, 
He tells it to his neighbor right, 

Who great surprise doth always feign. 
'Tis strange how he can eat and read, 

'Thout even one mistake, 
For sugar he might ask for salt, 

Or some such awful break. 

But no, you never need to fear 

Such dreadful, dire mishaps, 
For he has read since he was born, 

Of time that's quite a lapse. 
So long he's done it, that to him 

It is quite second nature ; 
He's very learned in all things, 

And is our brightest teacher. 




(99) 



What sauce for every gander is, 

For goose is likewise sauce ; 
Why can't we read, not while we eat, 

But simply 'tween each course? 
We greatly could improve our minds, 

And all our lessons get ; 
But, heedless of our urgent wish, 

This teachers will not let. 



For we are still too infantile 

To do two things at once, 
We might upset our soup on us, 

Or. act like some such dunce. 
But 'though such things here at Lasell 

Are not within our power, 
We've learned how we can, like the bee, 

Improve each shining hour. 



But if this man who now so much 

On every subject knows, 
Continues e'er to read, and gives 

His poor brain no repose, 
And longs for more and ever more 

Of Knowledge's fruitful tree, 
He surely will, as years roll by, 

The wisest mortal be. 




fioo) 



Tfpse Delinquent <y 



E 



VERY morn in chapel 

A stately form doth rise, 
Upon her angry, frowning face 
Is written great surprise. 
And in her hand she holds a list, 

And all do quake with fear, 
As slowly she doth speak the words : 
" See these delinquents here." 

" It seems to me you're very bold 

This duty to neglect, 
Miss Hubbard, you may look them up, 

Good excuses I expect. 
But should this method not succeed, 

Another way I'll try, 
The girl who fails to mark her walk 

I'll cause to heave a sigh." 

And then she does resume her seat, 
While we in trembling fear 

Into the hall do slowly file, 

Her threats still ringing in our ear. 



A Cinder in the Eye. 

At every entertainment, 

Whatever it may be, 
There's always some one naughty, 

As bad as bad can be. 
But once we were quite perfect, 

And caused Her not a sigh, 
Who oft complains, there's always one- 

" A cinder in the eye." 



The Lazy Monitress. 

Come ! wake up, Miss Fairchild ! 

Are you still asleep? 
To you I'd send a carriage, 

But one I do not keep. 



fioi) 




Tfltt-C ■> Txuitr 



(irind^. 



" If you have tears, prepare to shed them now." 



C. C. B. — "A man who's not afraid to say his say, though a whole town's against] him." 

Miss C. — " Reproof on her lips, but a smile in her eye." 

(102) 



Dr. S. — " Comb down his hair ; look ! look ! it stands upright ! " 

Mrs. Str-ng. — "As you are old and revered, you should be wise." 

J. Walter. — "I never heard so musical a discord, such sweet thunder." 

Joseph. — "He would .pun thee into shivers ; his jokes are Greek to others." 

Mrs. L-t-m-r. — "Poets are made, not born." 

Miss N— it. — "A kindlier woman treads not the earth." 

Fraulein. — "Thou hast thine own form." 

Miss Sh-nn. — " Intelligence and courtesy not always are combined." 

Mademoiselle. — "The Frenchman's darling." 

Miss All-n. — "Neat, not gaudy." 

Miss P-ck-rd. — "Nature formed but one such woman, and broke the die." 

Miss McM-rt-n. — "I've lived and loved." 

Miss R-ns-m. — "I hope you will not mock me with a husband." 

Miss Bl sd-l. — "A dinner lubricates business." 

H. R-ch. — "The lunatic, the lover, and the poet are of imagination all compact." 

H. Ryd-r. — "Come, quench your blushes." 

W. N-w-ll. — "The courageous captain of compliments." 

W. J. R-LF-. — " His chin, new reaped, 

Shewed like a stubble land at harvest home." 

(103) 




§?^eji 




Senior Class. — "Fools are my theme, let satire be my song." 

J. H-gg. — "I pray thee cease thy counsel, which falls into mine ears as profitless as water in 
a sieve." 

C. M-nn-ng. — "Many love me, yet by none am I enough loved." 

M-l T-yl-r. — "Some cupids kill with arrows, some with traps." 

A. N-BL-. — "She cannot love nor take no shape or project of affection, she is so self-endeared." 

C. G-lm-n. — "Arise! and shake the hay-seed from off thee." 
J. And-rs-n. — "You must not deny me." 

D. H-rts-n. — " At church, with meek and unaffected grace, 

Her looks adorn the venerable place." 

G. St rns. — " Love in that gentle heart is quickly and Richly learned." 

H. Sc T. — "I once had a dear little doll, dears." 

L. Pr-ct-r. — "Stiff in opinions; always in the wrong." 

(104) 



E. W-rn-ck. — "When the age is in, the wit is out." 

C. J— HNS-N. — "Practised to lisp and hang the head aside, 
Faints into airs, and languishes with pride." 

V. Wyck-ff. — "Greatest geniuses oft lie concealed." 

M. C-S-. — "I am nothing if not critical." 

B. Sh-ph-rd. — "I will not jump with common spirits, 

And rank me with the barbarous multitudes." 

M. Warr-n. — " For to the noble mind 

Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind." 

G. R-bb. — "Like sweet bells jangled out of tune, harsh." 

J. R-ch. — "Soft words, with nothing in them, make a song." 

G. Sh— rm— N. — "My mind to me an empire is." 

H. M-bsk-r. — " If she will, she will, you may depend on't, 

And if she won't, she won't, you may depend on't." 

M. T-ll-vs. — "A sight to dream of, not to tell." 



N. F-wl-r. — "A maiden modest, yet self-possessed." 
A. K-mb-ll. — "She came unlooked for, undesired." 
F. Cl-rk. — "'Of such vinegar aspect." 

(105) 



M. P-RK-, — "A fool must now and then be right, by chance." 

A. W-rn-r. — "The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder." 

A. W-lst-n. — "Sober as a judge." 

M. S-l-r. — " Vanity of vanities, all is vanity." 

M. Av-rv. — "A good familiar creature." 

C. S-w-n. — " I, to myself, am dearer than a friend." 

B. K-ll-y. — "When she looked sadly, it was for want of money." 

E. W-ks-n. — "A noble maiden, with toil prodigious, 
Her fault, she's almost too religious." 

K. P-nn-ll. — " The wasting moth n'er spoiled my best array, 
The cause was this, I wore it every day." 

A. B-RK— R. — " Conceit, in weakest bodies, strongest works." 

H. Fr b-. — "Greatness knows itself." 

A. Cl-rk. — "What is the use of so much talking?" 

E. H-nc-. — " Oh, she will sing the savageness out of a briar." 

L. M. H-bb-rd. — "If I showed interest in anything, people might think I was ignorant." 

A. Th-rst-n. — "I don't lithp, do I?" 

E. D — pk. — "Manners, not what but how." 

J. H-nt-r. — "A mighty hunter, and her prey was man." 

(106) 



N. Br-ggs. — "To see, and to be seen." 

H. L-rd. — "Everything is what it is, and not another thing." 

M. B-chr-gh. — "What pace is this that thy tongue keeps?" 

J. J-hns-n. — "I have a good eye; I can see a church by daylight." 

S. D-nh-m. — " Ah, her cheek was pale, 

Her voice was hardly musical." 

N. R-ws-N. — " Why, what's the matter that you have such a February face, so full of frost,, of 
storm, and cloudiness?" 

B. F-wl-r. — " None but herself can be her parallel." 

C. Cr-sw-ll. — "Better to wear out than to rust out." 

N. Eldr-dg-. — "A lovely being, lithely formed and moulded." 

O. H ly. — "I am not lean enough to be thought a good scholar." 

A. K-rr. — ") " And many a holy text they strew around, 

C. S — th-r. — J To teach us mortals how to die." 

M. P-rk-r. — " As idle as a painted ship 
Upon a painted ocean." 

B. H-yw-rd. — "Tetchy and wayward." 

E. L d. — " Lax in her gaiters, iaxer in her gait." 

L. Ch-pm-n. — " If nobody cares for me, 

I'll care for nobody." 

(107) 



A. Wh-tm-n. — "As headstrong as an allegory on the banks of the Nile." 

E. Br-dk-ck. — "I leave my character behind me." 

M. Cr — ksh-nk. — "An oyster may be crossed in love." 

E. Sx-ph-ns-n. — "Bright gem, instinct with music, vocal spark." 

E. P rs-n. — "Curiosity is but vanity." 

G. H-wl-nd. — "Here's a starched piece of austerity." 

A. H ght— N. — "Which not even critics criticise." 

F. J nn-s. — "A wearisome condition of humanity." 

B. R-p-r. — "The style is the girl." 

E. McE-hr-n. — "To see her is to love her, 

And love but her forever." 

G. B — B. — "Dwindle, peak and pine." 

G. B-ckn-m. — " To be a happy wife 

Is the dream of her life." 

V. Al-x-nd-r. — " Her actions speak much stronger than my pen." 

K. Ch-pm-n. — "I am sorry for thy much misgovernment." 

G. B-rth-l-m-w. — "An understanding simple, unschooled." 

J. Ch-ndl-r. — "A geometrical line, length without breadth." 

E. St-rk-y. — "O rare the head piece, if but brains were there." 

(108) 



R. Fr-nch. — " Ay, fashion you may call it." 

E. M-k-p — c-. — "Shut up in measureless content." 

B. B-tt-rf ld. — " Let no comforter delight mine ear." 

E. Bl r. — " Her head was bare, but for her native ornament of hair, which in a simple knot 

was tied above." 

E. F-rr-s. — "Famine is in thy cheeks." 

M. R d. — "Her very foot has music in't as she comes up the stairs." 

M. St-w-rt. — " As good as a comedy." 

J. F-tgh. — "Even in the afternoon of her best days." 

B. Br-ns-n. — "Too much of a good thing." 

H. F-tch. — " She would not with peremptory tone, 

Assert the nose upon her face her own." 

H. Cl — k. — "Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge." 

A. M-cK wn. — "Something between a hindrance and a help." 

G. J-hns-n. — "Always filling, never full." 

L. P. H-bb-rd. — "Wit, now and then, struck smartly, shows a spark," 

I. K-ss-ng-r. — "I prefer the nightingale herself." 

A. C-sh-ng. — "Quick and fine-witted." 

J. H-mm-nd. — "Not without art, but yet to nature true." 

(109) 



D. F-SCH-R. — "A babe in a house is a well-spring of pleasure." 

G. S-yd-r. — " When you abuse another, do you ne'er look back upon yourself? " 

B. Sm-th. — " O bed ! bed ! bed ! delicious bed ! " 
J. P rl. — " Frailty, thy name is woman ! " 

E. Sh-w. — "Why don't the men propose, mamma?" 
E. G-ll. — "Sweet is revenge, — especially to woman." 
W. C-nl-n. — " Folly loves the martyrdom of Fame." 

E. W-rn-r. — " With just enough of learning to misquote." 

A. B sl-y. — "Why, how you stand, girl!" 

N. W-lb-r. — " Order is Heaven's first law." 
K. B-ckn-m. — " Eyes of unholy blue." 

M. J-ss-LY-. — " Romance is always young." 

M. W-ls-n. — " Unthinking, idle, wild, and young, 

I laughed, and danced, and talked, and sung." 

C. Ch-r-h. — "A progeny of learning." 

E. Ch-r-h. — "On her own merits, Modesty is dumb." 

B. M-rr-m-n. — "Too civil, by far." 

J. B-rk-tt. — " Fll make thee famous by my pen." 

C. L-w-s. — "Low ambition and athirst for praise." 

(no) 



J. T-ll-ys. — "As silent as the pictures on the walls." 

F. F — rch-ld. — "Many can argue, not many converse." 

B. Sh-nn-n. — "Conspicuous by her absence." 

M. Sh-rtl-ff. — "I awoke one morning and found myself famous." 

M. F-ss-nd-n. — " 'lis impious in a good woman to look sad." 

F. R-v. — "Give your collar a party and invite your chin down." 

R. S b-rl-ng. — "And what's her history? 

A blank, my lord ; she never told her love ; 

She let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, 

Feed on her damask cheek ; 

She pin'd in thought, 

And with a green and yellow melancholy 

She sat like Patience on a monument, 

Smiling at grief. Was not this love indeed?" 

J_n r Cl-ss. — "Each is a part of one stupendous whole." 




(in) 




^lW& 



Dates. 



November 18. 


— Game Dinner. 


March 2. 


November 2 1 . 


— Patti. 




December 13 


— Lasellia Entertainment. 




January 22. — 


Mrs. Custer's Lecture. 


March 1 


January 23. — 


Dr. Steele had his hair cut. 


April 7. — 


January 24. — 


Mail boxes. 


April ti. 


January 25. — 


■ Day of Prayer. 




February 1 . — 


- It came to the Juniors. 


April 16.- 


February 8. — 


- It came again. 


April 27.- 


February 10. - 


— Senior French Play. 


April 30. - 


February 12.- 


— Dinner at five o'clock. 


May 4. — 


February 24. - 


— Fancy dress party. 


May 7. — 


February 26.- 


— Recital by the Elocution Pupils. 




February 28.- 


— Juniors' Reception. 





— Miss Medsker and Miss Fairchild 

were claimed by Morpheus at the 
Symphony. 
. — College Initiation. 

— Battalion Reception. 

— Edward Everett's birthday. Dead 
silence in Chapel. 

— The Cats' Concert in Rats' Retreat. 

— Junior Entertainment. 

— Senior Greek Play. 

■ S. D. Entertainment. 
Canoe Club " paddle their own canoe " 
for first time. 



(112) 



ALstellcmeoas. 



A Senior. — " Here comes another of the tribe." 
One Hour and a Half in Cooking Lecture. — 

" Time elaborately thrown away." 
Faculty Vote. — " Thou art weighed in the 

balances, and found wanting." 
Psychology Class. — " All hope abandon ye who 

enter here." 
Our Preceptress. — " With thoughts and feelings 

very simple, but very strong." 
Laboratory. — "I counted two and seventy 

stenches as well defined, and several 

stinks." 
Auburndale. — "As dead as Chelsea." 
Study Hours. — " To the girl who rooms alone — 

the bane of her existence." 
Wanted. — "A new joke ; must be rich and 

ste(a)rn(s)." 
Teacher in Literature. — " Dryden drank the 

last of his life, so died young." 



Some Queer Addresses. 

Lascell." " Laselle." " Lassal." " Lascelles." 
La Salle." "La Selle Sem., Oben Dale." 
L. Cemenry School, Abdan Dale, Mass." 
Laseel Semmery, Hoburndole." 
Laselle Cemenery. (Postmaster.)" 
Lasill Seminiry, Cinburndale, Mass." 
Laseelesse." " Lazzell Ciminary." " Laysale 

Sem." 
Madame Ciminary, La Salle, Mass." 
Mrs. Losell Sem." " Lasell's Seminary." 




§=^*5=^?-, w i Taj ' ° r 



The President of the Senior Class spells this 
way : " o-c-c-u-r-e-d " ! 

Miss Houghton prefers the white meat of the 
duck ! 

At Mrs. Custer's lecture, the earnings of the 
Senior Class, being their first, burnt their fingers 
and slipped through. They ought to inquire of the 
Juniors as to the best method of holding money. 

We are pleased to hear that Miss Medsker thinks 
of returning next year as an assistant in spelling ! 

At 10 P.M. 

On the floor are mysterious footsteps, 
. There are whispers along the walls. 

Teacher on inquiring as to whether any one 

had lost anything was informed by Miss S. that 

she had lost sixty cents. 

"In what form, Miss S. ? " "In change." 

Why is it that, in a company of young ladies, 

spiders and mice produce much the same effect? 



("3) 




To LaseU's Grandchildren. 



OUR book would not be complete unless it contained a message for you to whom we have 
dedicated it. 

We hardly expect some of you yet to enjoy the results of our labors. They are 
not as interesting to you as "Mother Goose," or the "Three Little Kittens," but we hope that 
in after years, when you have proved yourselves worthy of Alma Mater, you will read with interest 
these efforts of Ninety-five. 

Perhaps you yourselves will be Juniors some day ; then you will know what it is to bear 
the responsibility of editing your first book. May it bring you as much pleasure as this Allerlei 
has to us, and may your school days be as happy and joyous as ours have been. 

As we write these last words, our hearts are full of good wishes for your future ; may 
you have success in all your undertakings, and may you never forget the Class of Ninety-five ! 
Having finished our task, to you, and to all others, the Junior Class say, 

Farewell ! 
("4) 



Index. 



Edward Lasell . . 
Prof. C C. Bragdon 
Lasell Building, 1894 
Dedication .... 
Juniors' Allerlei . 
Photograph of Class 
Board of Editors 
Preface .... 
Board of Trustees 
Faculty .... 
Classes .... 
Freshman Quotation 
Register, Freshman Class 
Freshman Class History . 
Sophomore Quotation 
Register, Sophomore Class 
Sophomore Class History 
Junior Quotation . . . 
Register, Junior Class . . 
Letter from Honorary Membei 
Junior Class History 
Senior Quotation 
Register, Senior Class 
Senior Class History 



'AGE 

12 

13 

14 
15 
16 

18 
20 
21 
23 
24 
26 

27 
29 

30 
33 
35 
36 
3 9 
41 
42 
43 
45 
47 
4 S 



PAGE 

Irregulars 50 

In Memoriam 54 

S. D. Society 55 

Lasellia Club ... . 57 

" Lasell Leaves " 59 

Christian Associations ... 60 
Orphean Club .... .61 

Instrumental Club .... 62 

Vocal Quartets 63 

Pianoforte Quartets .... 63 
S. D. Glee, Banjo, Mandolin, 

and Guitar Clubs .... 64 
Lasellia Glee, Banjo, Mandolin, 

and Guitar Clubs .... 65 

Dress Cutting 66 

Stenography 66 

Cooking Classes 67 

Lasell Battalion 6S 

The Amazon — Ancient and 

Modern 69 

Studio 71 

Lasell at the World's Fair . . 72 

Circulating Library .... 74 



I'AGfc. 

Civil Government 76 

The Gong 77 

Senior Statistics 78 

The Senior Class 79 

The Typical Lasell Girl . . 85 

A Freshman's Letter .... 86 

Squashes 87 

Lazy Girls' Club 88 

A Didactic Tale 89 

Lasell Canoe Club 91 

Concentration 92 

Three Knights of the Round 

Table 94 

Monday Morning 95 

Questions 96 

A Psalm of Life 97 

The Book Worm 99 

Those Delinquents 101 

Grinds 102 

Dates 112 

Miscellaneous 113 

To LaselPs Grandchildren . . 114 

Read the Ads 116 



(ii5) 




W(U/{///'{(f(f/{////Mff/fM{M 




Index to Advertisements. 



PAGE 

Ailman, John H 120 

Allen, Hall, & Co 119 

Atwood, H. & R 129 

Babb, Edward E., & Co 120 

Barker & Starbird 122 

Bates, Geo. A 127 

Bent & Bush . . . 122 

Boston & Albany Railroad 4 

Bouquet Millinery 125 

Brown, E. A., & Co 127 

C. Brigham Company 129 

Capstick, Wm 126 

Chickering, Elmer 124 

Clapp, Otis, & Son 122 

Cobb, Aldrich, & Co 121 

Cook, T. D., & Co 125 

Dame, Stoddard, & Kendall 123 

DeWolfe, Fiske, & Co 124 

Fall River Line 119 

Foster, Stetson 125 

Franklin Educational Company 8 

Frost & Adams 6 

Goldthwait, Joel, & Co 118 

Hollander, L. P., & Co 7 

Jenkins, 0. A., & Co 118 

Johnson, George E 126 

Lamson & Hubbard 119 

Lasell Pins 118 



PAGE 

Lawrence, Wilde, & Co 122 

Lewis Confectionery 6 

Long, Thomas, & Co 125 

Magee, Chas. R 120 

Mason & Rich Vocation Co 8 

Melody, T. F 128 

Miller, Henry F., & Sons Piano Co 124 

Noyes Brothers 119 

Oliver Ditson Company 5 

Pettigrew, Wm 128 

Pluta, N. A 128 

Pond's Extract Company 123 

Putnam & Spooner 125 

Rockwell & Churchill 123 

Samuel Ward Company 125 

Schoenhof, Carl 8 

Seaver, Chandler 127 

Skinner & Arnold 129 

Springer Brothers 2 

Stowell, A., & Co 5 

The Moulton Cafe 3 

Thorp, Walter P 127 

Wadsworth, Howland, & Co 11S 

Wethern, George M 124 

Whitney's Handkerchiefs 9 

Woodland Park Hotel 126 

Woodward, J 128 



("7) 



Reserved 

for 

The Makers of the Lasell Pins. 



Especially <$oi}u<?[}iept for lasell ! 

OUR NEW STORE 

In the Grundmann Studios, Clarendon Street, near 

St. James Ave. and Huntingtox-Ave. 

Station on B. & A. R.R. 

We shall carry there a full line of 

Artist's Materials 

AND 



Drafting Supplies. 



PICTURE FRAMING A SPECIALTY. 



WADSWORTH, HOWLAND, & CO. (Incorporated), 

Grundmann Studios, Clarendon St., 

82 & 84 Washington St., Boston. 

CATALOGUE MAILED 
FREE. 



407 WASHINGTON STREET. 

CONNELLY'S New York Round 
Hats and Pattern Bonnets (for 
which we are the sole Boston agents) are 
now open for your inspection, together 
with our own specialties of HIGH-GRADE 
Millinery and Sailor Hats. 

We insure and store your Furs, hanging 
each garment on a separate form in con- 
structed moth-proof closets. 

We alter and repair your Furs during 
summer at Special Prices. 

O. A. JENKINS & CO. 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT & CO., 



FINE CARPETS 



AND 



ORIENTAL RUGS, 



162 to 169 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



(n8) 



New Cravats 



DlQYGS 



from ENGLISH FOULARDS 
in navy blue, royal blue, and 
light grounds, made in all the 
new shapes. Just received from London. 

For Street, For Driving. 

IE NEW GOLD TAN, 
THE FAMOUS LONDON TAN, $1.35. 
THE NEW CAVENDISH TAN, 

FOWNES'S RED TAN. 



Shirtings 



For Season 1894. 

Our Shirtings, Madras, Cheviot, and 
Oxford cloths, for the season of 1894, are 
now ready, and orders will be taken for Ladies' Shirts, Waists, 
Blouses, Jackets, Skirts, and Entire Suits, or sold by the yard 
in dress patterns, if desired. Also for Children's wear. For 
Men's and Youth's Business, Negligee, and Outing Shirts. 

POP I AMF^ SERGE SUITS, made to measure. 

ruK i^/\uikz>. Navy and black ; WHITE DUCK 

SUITS. JACKETS, GARMENTS, AND ULSTERS. 
WEDDING AND PARTY OUTFITS. 

Dress and Business Shirts, $1.50, $2.00, and up. 

NOYES BROTHERS, 

Washington and Summer Streets, Boston, U.S.A. 



Jew York t Fall Hiker Lire. 

STEAMERS 

PURITAN, # 

PILGRIM, % 

% PLYMOUTH, 

% PROVIDENCE. 

Pullman Vestibuled Express Train leaves Park Square Station, 
Boston, week days at 6 P.M., Sundays at 7 P.M., running through 
to steamer at Fall River in eighty minutes. 

Splendid Orchestra on each steamer. 

Baggage checked from Hotel or Residence in Boston to destina- 
tion. 

Tickets, staterooms, and berths secured at 

3 Old State House, cor. Washington and state Streets, 

And at Park Square Station. N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R. 



J. R. KENDRICK, 

President. 



GEO. L. CONNOR, 

Gen'l Pass. Agent. 

L. H. PALMER, Agent, 3 Old State House. 



ALLEN. MALL. & CO.. 

384 BOYLSTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 

Anterior 
SDecoyators a m> 
jfurnisbers. 

Original Designs for Entire and 
Complete Interiors a Specialty. 

Frescoing and Painting, Mantels, Furniture, Carpets, 
Stained Glass, Wall Papers, Drapery, 

Fine Woodwork, Upholstery, 

Tiles and Parquet Flooring. 

Estimates and Specifications on Application. 



Lasells World's Fair Case and Lasell's Dining-Room and Staircase are 
Specimens of our Designing and Workmanship. 



Laa\son & Hubbard. 

/AANLTACTLRERS AND 
RETAILERS OP 

LADIES' FURS. 



GARMENTS TAKEN ON STORAGE. 



92 Bedford Street, 
Boston, A\ass. 



(119) 



JOHN H. AILMAN, 

©ptician. 

Spectacles and Eye=Glasses. 

Artificial Eyes. 



MODERATE COST- FINE QUALITY- 



6 Bromfield Street, Boston. 



THE NEW 



^ International" Teacners' BiDie. 



NEW HELPS, CLEAR PRINT, 

NEW MAPS, MINIMUM SIZE, 

FINE BINDINGS. 



<^= 



.fis 



3) 



9. 



-c§- 



72K 



Edward sE. Babb & Co.. 



. . . DEALERS IN 



scnoDi books and scnooi Supplies 



OP EVERY DESCRIPTION, 



25 Arch Street, 



Boston, A\ass. 



The only Teachers' Bible having Helps prepared by both 
American and English scholars. The smallest large-type Bibles 
published. Moderate in price, convenient in size, and elegantly 
bound. 

Nearly 250 different styles. 

Ranging in price from 30 cents to $15. 

Descriptive Catalogue sent on request free of charge. 

CHAS. R. MAGEE, 38 Bromfield St., Boston. 

(120 s ) 



wSg)'' 



Cobb, Aldrich, & Co. 



THE ELEGANT NEW STORE, 

WASHINGTON AND KNEELAND STREETS. 



Situated in the corner of our elegant new store between the two 
main entrances is our Confectionery Department, which is one of the 
largest and the handsomest of any in this city. This is fully stocked with 



Fresh Confectionery 



of all kinds of the finest French Candies, including Nougatines, Bavarian, 
St. Nicholas, Montevideo, Nanon, Operas, Chocolate-Covered Caramels, 

« 

Opera Caramels, Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more common 
kinds. All of which are strictly and absolutely pure, and sold at moderate 
prices. 



THE FINEST GROCERY STORE IN AMERICA. 



Cobb, Aldricm, & Co., Boston. 



(121) 



iSE §APODONE FOR THE f EE7TH. 

SAPODONE is the trade name for a liquid, 
saponaceous dentifrice which is giving perfect 
satisfaction to those who use it. It contains no in- 
jurious ingredients or substance the use of which the 
most exacting dentist could not fully approve. 

It cleanses the teeth and sweetens the breath, and 
leaves a cool, refreshing sensation in the mouth. 

We desire to call your attention to this preparation, 
and invite you to give it a trial. 

Directions for Use. — First wet the brush, 
then add a small quantity of Sapodone, and apply 
to the teeth in the usual manner. 

Sapodone is put up in two sizes: 2-ounce vial, 
price, 35 cents ; 33^-ounce vial, price, 50 cents. 

Manufactured only by 

OTIS CLAPP & SON, 



10 Park Square, 

Boston. 



417 Westminster St., 
Providence. 



Barker & Starbird, 

MANUFACTURERS, IMPORTERS, 
.... AND DEALERS OF . . . 



:^lP>boto Supplies h* 

OP EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

KODAKS, KODAK FILMS. 

DEVELOPING, 
PRINTING, AND 
MOUNTING. 

56 Bromfield Street, Boston. 



Lawrence, Wilde, & Co., 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF FIRST-CLASS 



^furniture 



AND 



Interior Decorations, 



Nos. 38 TO 48 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 



WM. H. HULL, 
GEO. B. DARROW, 
C. P. DYER. 



D ENTS . 



• HI ■ 



USH, 



Ibatters 
ant) jfurriers, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



* G A P S * 

IN ALL SHAPES. 




387 

WASHINGTON 
STREET, . . . 
BOSTON. . . . 



(122) 




Dame, Jltodtod, $ Kendall 



MANUFACTURERS 
AND DEALERS IN 



ATHLETIC CLOTHING, 

SWEATERS, arid 

GYMNASIUM SUPPLIES. 

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF 

TENNIS GOODS, 
FINE CUTLERY, 
and FANCY LEATHER GOODS. 

374 Washington Street and 2 Franklin Street, 

BOSTON. 






Rockwell 8f Ctyurctyn 

Press, 
41 Arcl? St., Boston 



Makers of Fine Books like the "Allerlei," etc. 




Pond's Extract 



THIS IS THE GENUINE. 

Our trade-mark on Buff Wrapper around every bottle. 

THE WONDER OF HEALING. 
FOR RHEUMATISM, NEURALGIA, 
WOUNDS, SPRAINS, BRUISES, 



'*»5!S»b*SSbsb?»^" PILES, FEMALE COMPLAINTS, 



Refuse substitutes, INFLAMMATIONS, CATARRH, 
^ a eip] y C . rUdely ' 8 ° ld HEMORRHAGES, and ALL PAIN. 

Used Internally and Externally. SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 



Prices, 50c, Cheap. $1, Cheaper, Si. 75, Cheapest. 

Genuine is strong and pure. Can be diluted with water. 

Sole Manufacturers POMP'S EXTRACT CO., 76 FIFTH AVE.. NEW YORK. 



(123) 



. . . tor 



riNEi/niLUNERY 

VISIT 

George A\. Wethern, 



21 AND 23 
TEAAPLE PLACE. 



STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS GOODS AT POPULAR PRICES. 



ALL THE LATEST NOVELTIES 



IN 



FINE MILLINERY 

Ire shown on our counters as soon as in Paris, London, or 

Berlin Market. Your patronage is 

respectfully solicited. 

GEORGE M. WETHERN. 



BOOKS 



OF jkhh 



Can be bought of us to best 
advantage, as we carry the 
largest stock and make the 
lowest price 

DeWOLFE, FISKE, (£ CO.. 

THE ARCHWAY BOOKSTORE, 

361 and 365 wasiwon Street, Boston. 



Henry F.Miller 

•PIANOS- 




MANUFACTURED BY THE 



Henry F. Miller &Sons Piano Co. 



BOSTON 



PHILADELPHIA 




Artistic Photographer. 



A 1 



□ □ □ □ 

LL students at Lasell are entitled 
to our regular SCHOOL RATES 
for Cabinet Photos. The ARISTO 
finish being used when requested. 



21 West Street 



Boston. 



(124) 



^The JToung Imdies 

of Lasell Seminary need no introduction 
to our popular writing-papers : : : : 

Boston Linen — Boston Bond — Bunker Hill. 

This ad. is only to remind them that each year 
new styles, sizes, etc., are introduced, making 
them the leading writing-papers for fashion- 
able, foreign, and every-day correspondence. 

Samuel Ward Co., stationers and 

ENGRAVERS, 

49 Franklin St., Boston. 

Thomas Long & Co., 

77 SU/n/HER ST., BOSTON, 
IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 

NOVELTIES!! IN JEWELRY 

OF ALL KINDS. 

GOLD. — Solid and Plated. SILVER. — Sterling and Plated. 

Hair Ornaments of every description. 

Sterling Silver, Tortoise Shell, etc., etc. 
THOMAS LONG, FRANK F. DAVIDSON, 



Boston. 



Aubumdale. 




BRASS AND WHITE BEDSTEAD, 

: : : : WIRE SPRING BED, : : : : 

: : : : : HAIR MATTRESS. : : : : : 

Size, 6 feet 5 inches long by 3 feet wide. 

ALL FOR 

$22.00. 

PUTNAM & SPOONER, 

344 Boylston Street, Boston. 



STETSON FOSTER, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Furniture and Interior Woorl-woifc, 

IMPORTER OF 

Stuffs for Furniture Drapery and 

Wall Hangings, 
branch at 332 Boylston Street, 

BAR HARBOR, MAINE. BOSTON. 

LADIES .... 

WISHING TO PURCHASE THE CORRECT 
STYLES IN 

* MILLINERY $ 

AT LOWEST PRICES, SHOULD 
CALL AT THE 

.... BOUQUET, 

134 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO MOURNING ORDERS. 



LADIES' 



Located in the midst of the 
Shopping District. 



Three Large Attractive Dining-Rooms. 
Dainty Dishes, Nice Service. 



LUNCH. 



The most reasonable First-Class place to Lunch. 
Convenient to Theatres. 

23=31 Avon Street, Boston. 

CAKE, BONBONS, SALTED ALMONDS, AND FANCY 
NOVELTIES AT OUR COUNTER. 



T. D. COOK & CO., Caterers. 



fl2 5 ) 



"Wimjp) Park Hotel; 

Woodland Ave. and 
Washington St., 

AUBURNDALE, flASS. 



FIVE MINUTES' WALK FROM LASELL SEMINARY. 



For particulars and circulars address 

JOS. LEE, Proprietor. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 



<**r 



I^Ut #nun t anrl ^feerl, 



Lexington Street, 

AUBURNDALE. 



TELEPHONE. 




A 




WM. CAPSTICK, 



JTorK 



Aspen Avenue = = = = Auburndate. 



WEDDING DECORATIONS 

AND FUNERAL EMBLEMS 

AT SHORTEST NOTICE. 

ALSO, 

BEDDING PLANTS, 
CUT ROSES and CARNATIONS, 

A SPECIALTY. 



% 



(126) 



iEO. 



I/ITES, 



Thorpe House, Maple Street, 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 

MONDAY, 
TUESDAY, 
THURSDAY, 
SATURDAY, 



9 A.M. to 5 P.M. 



Walter P. Thorn, Ph.G., 
pharmacist, 

COR. AUBURN AND LEXINGTON STREETS, 
AUBURNDALE. 



Physicians' Prescriptions compounded promptly and 

accurately from drugs of known purity 

and strength. 

This department being personally conducted, receives the care 
and attention born of thirteen years' practical experience, qualified 
by registration in two States. 

A full line of 

PERFUMES, FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, 

STATIONERY, CONFECTIONERY, ETC. 

HOT AND COLD SODA IN THEIR SEASONS. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 



Graduate of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy. 
(TELEPHONE.) 



CHANDLER SEAVER, 



Portrait and landscape photographer, 



West Newton, Mass. 



READ THE SENIOR HISTORY! 



E. A. Brown & Co., 



Tickets, 

Placards, 

Programmes. 



BACON BLOCK, NEWTON. 



(127) 




WM. PETTIQREW, 



Contractor [or 

* Fine 



-TiSr 




BUILDING 



pirst-<5lass \\ou^e$ 

With every modern convenience 
and in the most approved styles. 



Shops on Prospect Street, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



4& 



T. F. MELODY, 

AUBURNDALE. 

(TELEPHONE No. 65-3.) 

Boarding, Baiting, Livery, and Sale 

Stable. 



Carriages a Specialty. 



ALSO, FINE COACH HORSES FOR SALE. 

V. A. Pluta, 

Ipeal^r it^ provisions, 

Corner of Auburn and Lexington Streets, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

J. WOODWARD, 

AUBURNDALE, 



DEALER IN 



Fresh Fruit, Vegetables, Fish. 



THE BEST TO BE HAD IN SEASON. 



(128) 






C. Brigham Company, 



Klk €nntxuttttXB. 



lUTTDR, 



AND 



iRCAM, 



FROM OUR OWN CREAMERIES. 



ORDERS BY MAIL, WIRE, OR TELEPHONE 
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



386 Tremont Street - - - Boston. 



% 



M. 6c R. ATWOOD, 



PLANTERS AND WHOLESALE 
DEALERS IN 



PROVIDENCE RIVER AND VIRGINIA 



©asters, 



ALSO 



All the Varieties of Native Oysters. 

49 COMMERCIAL and 56 CLINTON STREETS, 
146 and 148 ATLANTIC AVENUE, 

BOSTON. 

Skinner & Arnold, 

Hotel anH Restaurant Supplies. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS 
AND JOBBERS IN 



Swift's Choice Chicago Beef, 

Pork, Lard, Hams, Tripe, Pigs' Feet, 
Tongues, etc. 

28 Faneuil Hall Square, 



GEO. E. SKINNER. 

E. WATSON ARNOLD. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



(129) 








MM, 



mmfmwA